Clare Lombardo

You're reading NPR's weekly roundup of education news.

More teacher strikes could be on the way

Updated 9:38 a.m. ET Thursday

Union members in Los Angeles voted to approve a deal with the city's school district on Tuesday, ending a six-day teacher strike. Teachers headed back to class on Wednesday.

According to a Wednesday news release, 81 percent of United Teachers Los Angeles members who cast a ballot voted in favor of the agreement.

"I couldn't be prouder to be a teacher tonight," said UTLA President Alex Caputo-Pearl at a Tuesday news conference in which he announced the preliminary results.

As parents across Los Angeles dropped their kids off at school Monday morning, they were greeted by picket lines of teachers, many dressed in red ponchos and holding red umbrellas.

For the first time in nearly 30 years, educators in LA are on strike.

"Teachers want what students need," a crowd outside Theodore Roosevelt Senior High School in Boyle Heights chanted in the pouring rain.

Updated at 2:15 p.m. ET

President Trump has denied keeping details of his meetings with Russian President Vladimir Putin from his own administration.

"I'm not keeping anything under wraps. I couldn't care less," Trump said in an interview with Jeanine Pirro on Fox News on Saturday night.

College students across the country struggle with food insecurity.

Tuition and books, plus many hours away from a job, can be a huge financial burden on students — and for many, skipping meals can be a last-minute solution to a bad financial situation.

A new government report finds that millions of college students are very likely struggling. And the report — which is from the Government Accountability Office — concludes that the federal systems in place could do a better job of helping them.

After the 2016 presidential election, teachers across the country reported they were seeing increased name-calling and bullying in their classrooms. Now, research shows that those stories — at least in one state — are confirmed by student surveys.

"I'm here to raise a warning flag with American students and American taxpayers," Education Secretary Betsy DeVos said at a conference about federal student aid in Atlanta in November. "We have a crisis in higher education."

U.S. agents fired tear gas at a group of migrants on Sunday as they tried to cross into the United States from Tijuana, Mexico.

The incident took place at the San Ysidro Land Port of Entry between Tijuana and San Diego, where tens of thousands of people cross between the U.S. and Mexico each day.

Updated at 7:20 p.m. ET

A judge denied requests on Sunday from former Trump campaign aide George Papadopoulos to delay his scheduled sentence to prison. He'll head there Monday and stay for two weeks.

Papadopoulos pleaded guilty last year to lying to the FBI about his relationship with Russian officials and their intermediaries during the 2016 presidential election.

After more than two weeks, the Camp Fire of Northern California is 100 percent contained. It was both the deadliest and most destructive fire in California's history.

California fire authorities tweeted the news on Sunday morning.

The Department of Justice asked the Supreme Court on Friday to bypass lower courts and rule quickly on its ban of most transgender military members.

Protesters gathered in Paris on Saturday after more than a week of demonstrations across the country against high fuel prices.

According to The Associated Press, about 5,000 demonstrators rallied in the nation's capital, brandishing French flags and signs denigrating French President Emmanuel Macron.

As NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports from the city, protesters are building barricades in the streets while police fire tear gas and water cannons. They're wearing fluorescent yellow jackets, which everyone in France must carry in their cars, and screaming, "Macron, resign."

European Union leaders are poised to come to a deal on Brexit this weekend in Brussels.

The deal — a document of more than 500 pages — would allow the U.K. a 21-month "transition period" before breaking off from the EU. Though the U.K. would formally withdraw in March 2019, it would remain under EU regulations throughout the transition.

EU President Donald Tusk says he'd "recommend that we approve on Sunday," even though "no one has reasons to be happy."

You're reading NPR's weekly roundup of education news.

New rules on college campus sexual assault and harassment

Anticipation is growing along with the zeros in the Mega Millions lottery winnings. The prize hit $1.6 billion after no one won the jackpot in a drawing on Friday night.

That's the largest lottery jackpot in history, surpassing the $1.586 billion Powerball prize in January 2016.

Mega Millions lead director Gordon Medenica called it "uncharted territory."

A winner who wants the money in a lump sum can opt for the cash option of about $905 million.

The next drawing will be on Tuesday at 11 p.m. ET.

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