Fred Bever

News Reporter and Producer

A Columbia University graduate, Fred began his journalism career as a print reporter in Vermont, then came to Maine Public in 2001 as its political reporter, as well as serving as a host for a variety of Maine Public Radio and Maine Public Television programs. Fred later went on to become news director for New England Public Radio in Western Massachusetts and worked as a freelancer for National Public Radio and a number of regional public radio stations, including WBUR in Boston and NHPR in New Hampshire.

Fred formerly was Maine Public Radio’s chief political correspondent from 2001 to 2007 and returned to Maine Public Radio in early 2016 as a news reporter and producer, covering a wide variety of topics across Maine and the region.

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Maine Public

The parent company of Central Maine Power is proposing a $2.5 billion effort to "harden" its electricity distribution systems in Maine and New York, following major storms and outages over the past year — and the company would like to have consumers to pay some or all of the bill.

Fred Bever

Well more than 1,000 people crowded the steps of Portland's City Hall - and the street in front of it -  Saturday afternoon to protest President trump's immigration policies, including family separations at the borders.

About 100 people gathered on the steps of Portland City Hall Tuesday evening, hours after the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the Trump administration's travel ban in a 5-4 vote.   

The ban affects mostly majority-Muslim countries.  

Joanna Frankel, of Portland, said about a third of the students in her son's class at school are Muslims, and she's afraid that they will be to forced to leave.  While acknowledging that the ban applies to new arrivals, Frankel says she thinks the travel ban is part of a larger picture.  

Introspective Systems

Renewable energy sources like wind and solar are muscling their way into the country's energy mix. But they're still pretty unpredictable, creating significant management challenges and big swings in electricity prices. 

Abukar Adan / Maine Public

Central Maine Power (CMP) and Maine's consumer advocate have agreed that electricity consumers can be charged $34 million for costs related to recovery from the October 2017 wind storm, which cut services to thousands of Mainers.

The cost will largely be offset, says Public Advocate Barry Hobbins, by a recent cut in the federal corporate tax and by changes in accounting methodology that reduces consumer liability for costs stemming from this year's March storm.

Willis Ryder Arnold / Maine Public

Governor Paul LePage says he is stalling completion of an eight-year old state agreement to take ownership of the scenic Kennebec River Gorge – land that is now owned by Central Maine Power.

Three years in jail and $1.4 million in restitution: that's Ali Ratib Daham's sentence for a welfare fraud scheme he ran from a Portland halal market, according to a press release from U.S. District Attorney Halsey Frank.

U.S. District Court Judge D. Brock Hornby imposed the sentence, saying that Daham's actions caused distrust of government welfare programs and may lead to prejudice against welfare recipients and immigrants.

Fred Bever / Maine Public

North Berwick sports-seating manufacturer Hussey Seating is sounding alarms about the effect that President Donald Trump's steel tariffs are having on its bottom line – a concern Maine Senator Angus King says is widespread in the state and beyond.

Central Maine Power (CMP) and utilities in Massachusetts are announcing the finalization of a contract for CMP to build a new transmission line through western Maine.

The 20-year contract would bring hydro-electricity from Canada to customers in Massachusetts. The proposal is controversial as it is in the area of the Kennebec River Gorge, where CMP wants to site the high-voltage, direct-current power lines. The 145-mile project still must win state permits in Maine and Massachusetts, and faces federal review as well.

Fred Bever / Maine Public

Republican Shawn Moody dominated his party's gubernatorial primary last night, taking 56 percent of the vote, soundly besting his GOP competitors and apparently averting any further vote counting under the state's new ranked-choice voting law.

The mood at Moody's Gorham headquarters stayed buoyant through the evening, as results came in showing a consistently commanding lead. At 11 p.m., just in time for the late television news, he took the podium for a quick shoutout to his supporters.

Robert F. Bukaty / Associated Press

Maine's Public Utilities Commission today re-opened consideration of consumer subsidies for a floating wind turbine project planned off Monhegan Island, potentially adding more delay to its development.

A new analysis finds that Maine could add more than 2,000 jobs through aggressive participation in the region's emerging offshore wind industry.

The study from the nonprofit American Jobs Project was co-authored by Ryan Wallace, director of the University of Southern Maine's Center for Business and Economic Research.

“Maine has some competitive advantages in innovation, industry development, as well as industry clusters that could support a supply chain,” Wallace says.

Fred Bever / Maine Public

Central Maine Power (CMP) and a group of stakeholders in the western region of Maine, where the company wants to build a major new transmission line, have struck a mitigation deal worth up to $22 million.

Fred Bever / Maine Public

Solar power’s emergence as an important feature of New England’s energy landscape just hit an important milestone.

Normally the amount power drawn from the regional grid is lowest at night. But one sunny day this spring, residential solar arrays flipped that pattern around — and the phenomenon will likely become more frequent in New England.

It happened on April 21.

usgs.gov/media/images

Opposition is mounting to Central Maine Power’s proposal to build a major new transmission line through western Maine.

The 145-mile line would carry electricity from Canada’s Hydro-Quebec dam system to customers in Massachusetts. A growing number of stakeholders are saying there’s little or no benefit for Maine, while treasured resources, such as the Kennebec River Gorge, would be compromised.

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