Robbie Feinberg

Education News Producer

Robbie grew up in New Hampshire, but has since written stories for radio stations from Washington, DC, to a fishing village in Alaska. Robbie graduated from the University of Maryland and got his start in public radio at the Transom Story Workshop in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. Before arriving at Maine Public Radio, he worked in the Midwest, where he covered everything from beer to migrant labor for public radio station WMUK in Kalamazoo, Michigan.

Ways to Connect

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

When Maine voters head to the polls in November, they won't just be choosing candidates. They'll also consider a number of infrastructure bonds, including nearly $50 million in spending for the state's university system. University officials are calling it a "workforce bond" that will be an important piece of the effort to address Maine's ongoing labor shortage.

The Maine Department of Education has received more than $5 million from the federal government to support student mental health in three school districts.

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

Maine schools are at a crossroads.

Despite pushback from local officials, the U.S. Department of Labor has approved much of a new state policy requiring Maine's three regional workforce boards to spend at least 70 percent of their budget on direct job training.

Lewiston High School via Facebook

Some Maine school districts have yet to receive funding to help support homeless students due to what the Department Of Education says is a "scoring issue." The issue has delayed the application process for schools to receive thousands of dollars in federal grant funds.

Robert F. Bukaty / Associated Press

Colby College is following in the footsteps of several other Maine schools and getting rid of standardized testing admissions requirements.

In the wake of February’s school shooting in Parkland, Florida, districts across Maine have brought more police into schools. But new survey results from a team at the University of Southern Maine show that school resource officers are being used and trained in vastly different ways around the state.

Several towns have banded together to advocate for more state funding for some Maine school districts. The campaign, called "Raise The Floor," wants the state to provide more money to what are known as "minimum receiver" districts.

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

Maine’s School Revolving Renovation Fund was established some 20 years ago to help districts face the challenges of fixing aging schools, which have made tough choices due to years of underfunding. But that fund has yet to reach its financial goals, and now has little money left.

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

Many of Maine’s school buildings were built more than 50 years ago, and they need a lot of work: asbestos and lead removal, new roofs, windows and doors. But in the face of budget cuts after the Great Recession, many schools have struggled to keep up with those maintenance needs, forcing some districts to make tough choices.

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

More than three dozen college students protested outside of Republican U.S. Sen. Susan Collins’ office in Portland on Friday, urging her not to confirm Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

Maine’s State Board of Education approved a new kind of regional high school this week that would merge three existing schools and also bring in vocational programs, business training and higher education into one facility in northern Aroostook County.

Willis Ryder Arnold / Maine Public

Bells rang out in Portland and Lewiston Tuesday to honor the memory of those who died in the September 11 attacks in 2001.

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

In the wake of the fatal school shooting in Parkland, Florida earlier this year, schools across Maine are taking steps to respond and increasing security measures.

Despite privacy concerns from school officials, the legislature's education committee endorsed a bill Thursday that would mandate that Maine schools quickly report investigations of the conduct of credentialed school staff to the state.

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