Robbie Feinberg

Education News Producer

Robbie grew up in New Hampshire, but has since written stories for radio stations from Washington, DC, to a fishing village in Alaska. Robbie graduated from the University of Maryland and got his start in public radio at the Transom Story Workshop in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. Before arriving at Maine Public Radio, he worked in the Midwest, where he covered everything from beer to migrant labor for public radio station WMUK in Kalamazoo, Michigan.

Ways to Connect

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

More than three dozen college students protested outside of Republican U.S. Sen. Susan Collins’ office in Portland on Friday, urging her not to confirm Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

Maine’s State Board of Education approved a new kind of regional high school this week that would merge three existing schools and also bring in vocational programs, business training and higher education into one facility in northern Aroostook County.

Willis Ryder Arnold / Maine Public

Bells rang out in Portland and Lewiston Tuesday to honor the memory of those who died in the September 11 attacks in 2001.

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

In the wake of the fatal school shooting in Parkland, Florida earlier this year, schools across Maine are taking steps to respond and increasing security measures.

Despite privacy concerns from school officials, the legislature's education committee endorsed a bill Thursday that would mandate that Maine schools quickly report investigations of the conduct of credentialed school staff to the state.

Carolyn Kaster / AP Photo

U.S. Sen. Angus King has joined more than 40 Democratic senators to oppose a reported plan by the U.S. Department of Education to use some federal funds to pay for guns and firearms training in schools.

Three Maine families are challenging a state law that prohibits religious schools from receiving publicly funded tuition reimbursements.

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

With aging buildings and changes in population, school districts around Maine are planning and building more modern campuses. But some of the projects have encountered an unexpected obstacle: a sharp increase in cost, as competition and a shortage of labor have led some project costs to increase by 30 percent or more.

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

Summer school is changing — it used to be the place where high schoolers made up failed classes, but some districts have doubled summer enrollment in recent years.

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

Portland voters won’t get to decide this fall on whether to allow non-citizen legal residents to vote in the city’s local elections. The Portland City Council voted Monday night to send a potential ballot question to a local council committee instead of to voters, saying the measure still needed substantial work.

Maine Arts Commission

The National Endowment for the Arts is planning to eliminate a rule that prohibits some noncitizens from competing in a national poetry competition.

The decision comes four months after Deering High School student Allan Monga sued the federal agency for not allowing him to compete in the national Poetry Out Loud competition.

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

After hearing from more than a dozen parents and students Tuesday night, the Portland Board of Education narrowly passed a resolution supporting a potential voter referendum that would allow legal non-citizen residents to vote in the city’s local elections.

 

The proposal from Portland Councilor Pious Ali and Mayor Ethan Strimling would make Portland the first city in the state to allow non-citizens to vote.

 

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

Teacher strikes in Oklahoma and West Virginia this year have put educators in the political spotlight, and some of that energy appears to have spread to Maine. After years of conflict over school funding and educational mandates, more than a dozen current and former teachers are running for office this fall.

With the same energy that she used to bring to her classroom, Jan Dodge is spending a Tuesday afternoon knocking on doors in her hometown of Belfast.

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

Four months ago, hundreds of students across Maine walked out of their schools, joining others across the country in memorializing the victims of the fatal school shooting in Parkland, Fla. and to advocate for gun control.

Maine Public

Students in Maine will no longer be required to graduate under new, "proficiency-based" diplomas.

Gov. Paul LePage Friday signed a bill into law repealing the state's diploma mandate, which originally went into effect six years ago.

Under the old law, Maine students, beginning in the class of 2021, would have been required to reach "proficiency" in up to eight subject areas in order to graduate. However, teachers and parents criticized the policy, saying it was too demanding for educators and wouldn't allow some students to graduate.

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