Robbie Feinberg

Education News Producer

Robbie grew up in New Hampshire, but has since written stories for radio stations from Washington, DC, to a fishing village in Alaska. Robbie graduated from the University of Maryland and got his start in public radio at the Transom Story Workshop in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. Before arriving at Maine Public Radio, he worked in the Midwest, where he covered everything from beer to migrant labor for public radio station WMUK in Kalamazoo, Michigan.

Ways to Connect

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

Thousands of students across the country walked out of their schools Wednesday in remembrance of the 17 victims of last month's school shooting in Parkland, Fla. and to protest for stricter gun laws. A major snowstorm delayed many school walkouts in Maine until Thursday. Some students were punished for their protests, but said they still felt empowered to take action.

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

Days before planned walkouts at thousands of schools across the country, students in the Bangor area say they want lawmakers to take action to prevent school shootings.

BRIAN BECHARD / Maine Public

Maine's Department of Education has proposed new rules that would make it easier for some people to become teachers. Instead of having to take a teacher prep program through a college, they could qualify by having enough "related" work experience. Opponents, including some professors in Maine's teacher preparation programs, say the new proposed rules could bring under-prepared teachers into the classroom and eventually cost districts more money.

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

For more than a century, Maine has offered its own version of “school choice” called “town tuitioning”. If a student lives in a district without a public school at a certain grade level, the town and district will pay a specific rate to send that student to the public or private school of their choice.

After losing a lengthy lawsuit, the LePage administration is finally releasing millions of dollars in job training funds to Maine's regional workforce boards. But now proposed requirements on how to spend the money have some workforce board officials unsure if they can build the state's job training system back up to what it once was.

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

A lawyer representing Scarborough High School Principal David Creech says that the district's board of education has refused the principal's request to stay on as principal.

Creech announced his resignation earlier this month, following months of conflict in Scarborough over a new school start time policy that concerned some parents and teachers. But Creech's attorney, Bill Michaud, says the principal was pressured into resigning by the school's superintendent and received little explanation behind the decision.

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

Hundreds of students and parents flooded the sidewalks near Scarborough High School early Monday morning, protesting the resignation of the school’s principal, David Creech.

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

Maine was the first state in the country to embrace a new “proficiency-based” high school diploma. Maine's current ninth-graders are set to graduate under these new requirements, which apply to subjects from math to English and social studies. However, the Maine Department of Education is considering a change in that law that would potentially make it less onerous to graduate.

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

Over the next few months, towns across Maine will vote on local school budgets, a process that can turn divisive as costs rise and older residents on fixed incomes feel the pinch. But in the small town of Medway, near Millinocket, there’s an effort underway to bring some of those elders into the classroom, and help them feel like they're a part of the school community.

pihs.sad1.org

A unique school tradition will come to an end in one Aroostook County town next year. Wednesday night, the school board for SAD 1, in Presque Isle, voted to eliminate “harvest break” – a three week period in the fall when students leave the classroom and help to harvest potatoes. In recent years other towns have also eliminated the break. However, school officials expect that the unusual practice will continue in a few places.

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

This fall, many Maine schools are expected to get more money from the state as part of a budget deal reached last year, and one of the major funding boosts is for public preschool.

Brian Bechard / Maine Public

Maine school districts learned Wednesday how much state funding they will be getting from the state this year, a crucial factor administrators use to calculate their districts' annual budgets.  

The yearly allocations are based on the state budget passed in July. That bill included an increase of $162 million for education funding, for a grand total of $1.1 billion.

Thomas College wants to eliminate textbooks in some of its courses as a way to lower costs for students.

The Waterville-based college announced Tuesday that it will use a $140,000 grant to transition away from requiring textbooks to using free online resources in 30 courses over the next three years. That's out of about 250 courses that the school offers each semester.

A federal judge Wednesday denied a request by Gov. Paul LePage to withhold about $3 million in federal job training funds from one of Maine's regional workforce boards while a lawsuit brought against his administration is appealed.

A new bill would restore state funding for school administrators that could be cut in some districts as part of last year's budget agreement. Maine school leaders want to restore state funding for administrators that could be cut for some districts as part of last year's budget agreement.

Under last year's agreement, districts that do not join "regional service centers" could lose nearly $100 per student from the state in coming years. On Wednesday, lawmakers heard from school officials who supported getting rid of those potential cuts.

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