Susan Sharon

Deputy News Director

Susan is the deputy news director who handles assignments and planning by the news staff. She’s also a general assignment reporter who began her career at Maine Public Radio working at the State House in 1992, and still loves the work, which takes her to the Maine State Prison for a story on solitary confinement one day and to the foothills of western Maine to look for wood thrush the next.

Susan is a graduate of the University of Montana, where she got her first job in public radio news while still a student. She has also worked at television stations in Montana and Maine. You can occasionally hear her stories on NPR.

Ways to Connect

Maine Department of Corrections

A prisoner who walked away from the Mountain View Correctional Center in Charleston last Thursday has been taken into custody.  The Piscataquis County Sheriff's Office says Arnold Nash was found in the Charleston area at about 7 o'clock Tuesday morning.

Susan Sharon / Maine Public

Sweeping changes proposed to the federal Endangered Species Act have conservation groups and others alarmed about protecting plants and animals on the verge of extinction in Maine and around the country.

Susan Sharon / Maine Public

Call it a potential match made in prison.

Andrew Harnik / Associated Press

Maine U.S. Sen. Angus King is among those raising concerns about a Trump White House decision to claim executive privilege and withhold 100,000 pages of documents relating to Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh's years spent as White House counsel during the George W. Bush administration.

St. Mary's Regional Medical Center

Two Lewiston hospitals have undertaken corrective action after the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid found they were turning away mentally ill patients in crisis from their emergency departments without adequate medical screenings or stabilizing treatment. Both hospitals were found to be in violation of a federal law that is intended to protect patients experiencing medical emergencies.

Gov. LePage

A federal judge in Maine has refused to dismiss a lawsuit challenging the practice of Gov. LePage to block constituents he disagrees with from his Facebook page.

Susan Sharon / Maine Public

Seth Carey, an attorney and Republican candidate for district attorney in Franklin, Oxford and Androscoggin Counties, is fighting for the right to continue to practice law after a former client accused him of sexual misconduct and assault.

  

All this week we’ve been reporting on how evictions are financially and emotionally costly for landlords and tenants. Both parties generally want the same thing: the rent to be paid in full and on time. But as housing costs and rents continue to rise faster than wages, low income advocates say policy changes are necessary to support thousands of at-risk Mainers.  This is the fifth in our series, "Eviction: Life Unpacked." 

(To read the text version of this story, click here) 

A recent study by the National Low Income Housing Coalition finds that for every 10 Maine families seeking affordable rental housing, there are fewer than 6 units available.

Many of these households spend more than half of their incomes on housing and utilities. They may qualify for housing assistance such as Section 8, but there's often at least a three-year wait. And there are other barriers that can get in the way of help.

(To read the text version of this story, click here)

Every week in Maine, landlords try to evict more than 100 tenants through the courts. Others work out informal agreements to have tenants leave by a certain date. Either way, it can be a confusing and frustrating process for both sides.

(To read the text version of this story, click here)

In Maine and around the country, evictions are taking a heavy toll — on landlords, tenants and their communities. For landlords, there's the challenge of covering bills when rent isn't paid. For chronically poor tenants, getting evicted often leads to homelessness. And for neighborhoods, studies show, high eviction rates contribute to instability and, with it, increased crime.

(To read the text version of this story, click here)

In Maine and around the country, evictions are taking a heavy toll — on landlords, tenants and their communities. For landlords, there's the challenge of covering bills when rent isn't paid. For chronically poor tenants, getting evicted often leads to homelessness. And for neighborhoods, studies show, high eviction rates contribute to instability and, with it, increased crime.

(To read the text version of this story, click here)

Susan Sharon / Maine Public

All this week we’ll be taking an in-depth look at the problem of eviction in Maine in a series called “Eviction: Life Unpacked.”

Flickr

The American Civil Liberties Union of Maine has filed suit against the commissioner of the Maine Department of Corrections and the acting Aroostook County Sheriff for denying medication-assisted treatment (MAT) to a prisoner with opioid use disorder.

The lawsuit is being brought on behalf of Zachary Smith of Caribou, who has been in recovery for more than five years.

Susan Sharon / Maine Public

Swimming lessons are in full swing around lakes, ponds and pools this summer. But even in a state like Maine, with so many bodies of water, getting access to lessons can be challenging.

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