Maine

Maine news

Celie Deagle / For Maine Public

About twenty people spent their lunch break in downtown Bangor Tuesday protesting President Trump's nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court.

Jill Weber, a member of activist group Indivisible MDI, arrived wearing a black robe and carrying a poster that gave her the hair, earrings and necklace of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. She hopes Senators Collins and King vote against Kavanaugh's nomination. 

The Maine Public Utilities Commission has unanimously voted to expand the investigation of Central Maine Power’s billing system. 

Liberty Consulting’s audit will now review how CMP has handled consumer complaints about the system that was implemented last fall. 

“Matching the Liberty Consulting group’s audit scope to the summary investigation scope will assure no stone is left unturned, which will improve the overall quality of the result," said Commissioner Randall Davis.

Maine's top health and human services official says Maine's struggling child welfare system needs staffing, a new computer system and changes to mandatory reporting and family reunification policies.

Department of Health and Human Services Commissioner Ricker Hamilton told the Legislature's Government Oversight Committee that Republican Gov. Paul LePage will propose such ideas in upcoming legislation. The governor's office didn't immediately respond to request for comment.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/esiena/

We know a great deal about famous people, great historical architecture and important past events, but we are also surrounded by common, everyday places that represent history. But these ordinary things are in danger of becoming forgotten. Learn about common clues to the past that are all around us, how to read them and what we find in our own backyards.  

UNE.edu

Most students applying for admission to the University of New England will no longer need to submit standardized test scores such as the SAT or ACT, beginning in the fall of 2019.

The Biddeford-based school follows in the footsteps of dozens of others that have adopted "test-optional" admissions policies over the past four years.

Dean of Admissions Scott Steinberg says UNE has found that high school grades predict college success far better than standardized tests.

Exercise and Mental Health: How Do They Correlate?

Jul 9, 2018
https://www.flickr.com/photos/34536315@N04/

For years scientists and researchers have been extolling the benefits of exercise to our physical well being. Now they are discovering the positive impacts physical activity has on mental health.  We’ll discuss ways to get more exercise into your life and how it can help you feel better—both physically and psychologically.

AUGUSTA, Maine - A Maine police department has thrown their own celebration for an 8-year-old girl who had no one show up to her birthday party.
 
WCSH-TV reports the Augusta Police Department put on a party Sunday for Larriah Binns in Augusta complete with balloons and birthday cake.
 
Larriah's mother, Angelique Binns, says she had a birthday celebration planned for Saturday, but none of her daughter's friends could come.
 

HTTPS://WWW.FLICKR.COM/PHOTOS/KEYCMNDR/

This is a rebroadcast of an earlier show (June 1st); no calls will be taken.

One of our most popular programs—what to read this summer! Our all-star cast shares the books they’ve read recently and are looking forward to reading this summer.  

Guests:  Richard Russo, author of eight novels, including Empire Falls, which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 2002. His new book is The Destiny Thief—Essays on Writing, Writers and Life.Josh Bodwell, Executive Director of the Maine Writers & Publishers Alliance. He’s the series editor of a three-volume relaunch of the collected short stories and novellas of Andre Dubus. The first two volumes were released on June 20. Richard Russo wrote the introduction to Volume 2.Kate Christensen, author of seven novels, including The Great Man, which won the 2008 PEN/Faulkner Award for fiction, and soon to be released The Last Cruise. She’s the author of two food-centric memoirs, Blue Plate Special and How to Cook a Moose, which won the 2016 Maine Literary Award for Memoir.Terri-Lynne DeFino, author of The Bar Harbor Retirement Home for Famous Writers (And Their Muses). [VIP caller]Emily Connelly, editorial assistant with AudioFile Magazine

  • “Natural Causes: An Epidemic of Wellness, the Certainty of Dying, and Killing Ourselves to Live Longer,” by Barbara Ehrenreich
  • “House of Broken Angels,” by Luis Alberto Urea
  • “The Last Cruise,” by Kate Christensen
  • "Sunburn," by Laura Lippman
  • "The Devil's Highway," by Luis Alberto Urrea
  • "Trajectory," by Richard Russo
  • “Moby Dick,” by Herman Melville
  • “Kudos,” by Rachel Cusk, the final book in her "Outline" trilogy.
  • “Sick,” by Porochista Khakpour
  • “My Ex-Life,” by Stephen McCauley
  • In Honor Of Father’s Day, June 17: “When I First Held You: 22 Critically Acclaimed Writers Talk About the Triumphs, Challenges, and Transformative Experience of Fatherhood,” edited by Brian Gresko
  • The. Best. (So Far In 2018): “Anything Is Possible,” by Elizabeth Strout
  • Must-Reads For Writers: “Draft No. 4,” by John McPhee and “The Destiny Thief: Essays on Writing, Writers, and Life,” by Richard Russo
  • Must-Read For Readers: “The Book: An Homage,” by Burkhard Spinnen
  • Read Before You See The Movie This Summer: “The Bookshop,” by Penelope Fitzgerald, “Wildlife,” by Richard Ford and “Lean on Pete,” by Willy Vlautin
  • In Celebration Of National Short Story Month, May: “Varieties of Exile” and “Paris Stories,” both by Mavis Gallant and “So Long: Stories 1987-1992” and “Where I Live Now: Stories 1993-1998,” both by Lucia Berlin
  • To-Be-Read This Summer: “The Last Cruise,” by Kate Christensen, “The Fact of a Body,” by Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich, “The Burning Girl,” by Claire Messud and “Little Fires Everywhere,” by Celeste Ng
  • "All the Ever Afters," by Danielle Teller
  • "This Dark Road to Mercy" and "The Last Ballad," both by Wiley Cash
     
  • AudioFile Sync summer audiobook program
  • "Lincoln in the Bardo," by George Saunders
  • "Children of Blood and Bone," by Tomi Adeyemi
  • "Give Me Some Truth," by Eric Gansworth
  • "The Hate You Give," by Angie Thomas
  • "Born a Crime," by Trevor Noah
  • "The Dublin Murder Squad Mysteries," by Tana French
  • "Circe," by Madeline Miller
  • Island Readers and Writers lists
  • Rockport Public Library book sale
  • George Guidall event at the Patten Free Library in Bath
  • "Florida," Lauren Groff
  • "Turtles All The Way Down," John Green
  • "Jabari Jumps," by Gaia Cornwall
  • "A Gentleman in Moscow," by Amor Towles
  • "Lost Empress," by Sergio De La Pava
  • "The Overstory," by Richard Powers
  • "The Fun Mover Chronicles," by Tim Fahey
  • "The Stand," by Stephen King
  • "Vacationland," by John Hodgman
  • "Stranded: A Story of Frontier Survival," by Matthew Mayo
  • "White Pine: American History and the Tree that Made a Nation," by Andrew Vietze
  • "Trap the Devil," by Ben Coes
  • "Voting Down the Rose: Florence Brooks Whitehouse and Maine's Fight for Woman Suffrage," by Anne B. Gass
  • "Beyond the Road," by Jt Curran
  • "The Believing Brain," by Michael Shermer
  • "Calypso," by David Sedaris
  • "The Swan Thieves," by Elizabeth Kostova
  • "Camulod Chronicles Series," by Jack Whyte
  • "Call Me American," by Abdi Nor Iftin
  • "When We Were the Kennedys," by Monica Wood
  • "Into the Raging Sea: Thirty-Three Mariners, One Megastorm, and the Sinking of El Faro," by Rachel Slade
  • "Waking Lions," by Ayelet Gundar-Goshen
  • Jen Blood's K-9 series

 

After responding to two heat-related emergencies this week, the Maine Warden Service is urging hikers to be prepared before setting out on Maine's rigorous Appalachian Trail.

Maine Warden Corporal John MacDonald says the service received a call Thursday from a 21-year-old woman hiking southbound and complaining of nausea. She received medical treatment at the scene and was then transported to a hospital in Greenville.

Tuesday a 67-year-old man was assisted off the trail with heat exhaustion and brought to a hospital for evaluation.

City officials, including the mayor of Portland, faced a hostile crowd of residents who oppose a plan to build a new emergency homeless shelter.

The city meeting Thursday was meant to address concerns about a city plan to build a $10 million, 200-bed emergency shelter at a city-run nursing home. The Portland Press Herald reports residents attending the meeting were concerned about issues at the Oxford Street Shelter, which is in a converted apartment building and is over capacity, coming to their neighborhood.

Summer Reads: Book Recommendations For The Season

Jul 6, 2018
https://www.flickr.com/photos/keycmndr/

This is a rebroadcast of an earlier show (original air date June 1st); no calls will be taken.  

One of our most popular programs — what to read this summer! Our all-star cast will share the books they’ve read recently and are looking forward to reading. This summer also sees PBS' "Great American Read," an eight-part series that explores and celebrates the power of reading, told through the prism of America’s 100 best-loved novels, as chosen in a national survey.

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

Over the course of the past school year, we've followed the implementation of Maine’s proficiency-based diploma law through the lens of students and staffers at Oak Hill High School, near Lewiston. 

The Maine Girls' Academy has announced that it will shut its doors later in July.

The Portland-based school, which is the only all-girls private school in the state, announced the decision Thursday on its website.

The academy's board chair, Heidi Osborn, says the decision ultimately came down to declining enrollment and revenue. She says only 91 girls were enrolled at the school last year.

"We just ran out of runway to turn it into a successful and sustainable school."

Maine Republicans are decrying an effort by some Democratic lawmakers urging Kittery Trading Post to stop selling assault-style rifles.

In an open letter supporting the Maine store, Republican Rep. Heidi Sampson says Democratic lawmakers are harassing the business.

Three York County Democrats sent their own letter earlier this week asking the Kittery Trading Post to stop selling assault-style rifles like larger national stores. Reps. Dean Rykerson, Patricia Hymanson and Lydia Blume also asked the trading post to raise its gun purchasing age to 21.

Fred J. Field / AP Photo

The U.S. Customs and Border Patrol's Maine office says its agents have interviewed occupants of 21 Canadian-registered boats since last fall. The statement comes after a flurry of attention to border patrol activity in the area of Machias Seal Island, an area to which both the U.S. and Canada lay claim.

Pages