New England News Collaborative

Dairy farmers in the Northeast say they're ready to talk about something that's been almost off limits for decades: how to manage the milk supply to stop overproduction.

When it’s time to pour the concrete, a construction worker may suffer through a back strain and use prescribed painkillers to stay on the job. Same for an injured deckhand heading to Georges Bank to haul in nets filled with fish.

A path from injury to medication, and then to addiction and death, may explain why workers in these jobs — men in particular — have had in recent years fatal opioid overdoses far more often in Massachusetts than do workers as a whole.

On a quiet street by Green Hill Pond in Charlestown about a mile away from the ocean, Andrew Baer walks onto his front lawn and asks for help sliding the cap off his well. Luckily, he's having solar panels installed and there are plenty of hands at-the-ready. 

Next month a new theater troupe, the Borderline Players, will put on its first summer musical. You can see the show in the U.S. or Canada — depending on where in the theater you sit.

A Republican member of Congress is introducing a bill he says will patch up crumbling infrastructure, while also fighting climate change. It’s called a carbon tax. The idea centers around putting a price on pollution and funnelling money collected back into roads and bridges across America.

An international border divides Lake Memphremagog in Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom. And for the last seven summers, a group of marathon swimmers have challenged that border and themselves.

Tatiana Melendez waited in the shade during a New England heat wave, ready to make a move.

“I got all the information for you, all right,” Melendez, 46, said as she handed a baggie of info to a passerby. “This is very good for you. For everybody doing sex.”

A Nature Conservancy project in northern Vermont will store carbon to meet California’s greenhouse gas reduction goals. The group says proceeds from the sale of these “carbon credits” will pay for future land protection projects.

Jesse Costa / WBUR

It's a hot day in Brownsville, Texas. U.S. House Rep. Chellie Pingree of Maine sits shotgun in a silver Mercedes SUV, talking to her driver, a Brownsville city official. She turns around, leaning over her left shoulder and explains what it was like earlier in the day when she spoke with a group of migrant mothers in a nearby U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detention facility.

Maple syrup producers take pride in their pure, natural product. So when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration proposed new labels to say maple syrup contains “added sugar,” producers fought back.

Along the northern border where Vermont, New Hampshire and New York meet Canada, U.S. Customs and Border Protection pilot Gerhardt Perry routinely flies an infrared camera-equipped Cessna 206 on patrols that can last up to four hours.

New Hampshire’s Seacoast is home to some of the earliest history of European settlers anywhere in the country. Believe it or not, much of that history is still being uncovered.

But now climate change and sea-level rise is adding new urgency to those efforts.

NHPR’s Jason Moon joined a UNH researcher for a hike to see a centuries-old archaeological site that is literally washing away.

Northeast Farmers Say Fruit Trees Safe From Late-Spring Frost

Apr 17, 2018
Dean Morley / Flickr/Creative Commons

The ice and snow between Sunday and Monday will apparently not do widespread damage to the region’s fruit-tree crop. That’s according to Timothy Smith, who runs Apex Orchards, a 35-acre apple, peach and pear farm in Shelburne, Massachusetts.

How The Boston Marathon Bombing Helped Bring Innovation To Amputation

Apr 16, 2018
Robin Lubbock / WBUR

Army veteran Brandon Korona pulls up his pant leg, rearranges a protective sleeve, and twists off the plastic socket on top of his prosthetic left leg. It comes off with a suction cup-like pop.

Army veteran Brandon Korona pulls up his pant leg, rearranges a protective sleeve, and twists off the plastic socket on top of his prosthetic left leg. It comes off with a suction cup-like pop.

“There we go,” says Korona.

As Korona gets comfortable in a physical therapy room at Brigham and Women’s Faulkner Hospital, Dr. Matthew Carty pulls up a chair and examines the end of the residual limb, poking and prodding the stump that ends about four inches below Korona’s knee joint.

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