Environment and Outdoors

Environmental news

Caroline Losneck / Maine Public/file

A 100-year flood is supposed to be just that: a flood that occurs once every 100 years, or a flood that has a 1% chance of happening every year.

CONCORD, N.H. - The Environmental Protection Agency says that New England has met air quality standards for sulfur dioxide after improvements were seen in parts of New Hampshire.

EUROPANEWSWIRE/GADO/GETTY IMAGES

Greenhouse gas emissions could cause the Earth’s temperature to rise higher than previously estimated and far beyond the targeted limits, according to a study released Tuesday.

Jason DeCrow / Associated Press

Gov. Janet Mills told the United Nations General Assembly in New York on Monday that Maine will be carbon neutral by the 2045.

Mills told the international audience that Maine is feeling the effects of climate change and is taking steps to address the problem.

Barbara Cariddi / Maine Public

Maine is now home to dozens of invasive species of plants and insects. These are species that didn’t evolve here, and now they’re threatening plants that did. And that threat extends to the native insects, birds and other living things that depend on those plants.

Throughout history, human beings have demonstrated a seemingly innate desire to leave their mark on the world, with some experts suggesting that the same neurochemistry that drives animals to promote their genes also pushes people to want to leave their trace on the planet.

Is Compost the Secret to Making Ag Climate Friendly?

Sep 22, 2019

It’s no secret that organic farmers believe in compost, but just what role compost plays in soil’s ability to store carbon—and keep it out of the atmosphere, where it contributes to climate change—has been less clear.

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

From Portland to Norway and Bar Harbor, thousands of teens across Maine left their schools Friday to demand action on climate change.

The broadcasters – often among the most trusted voices in their communities – are connecting the dots between extreme weather and climate science, and shifting public opinion.

Local TV weather forecasters have become foot soldiers in the war against climate misinformation. Over the past decade, a growing number of meteorologists and weathercasters have begun addressing the climate crisis either as part of their weather forecasts, or in separate, independent news reports to help their viewers understand what is happening and why it is important.

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

The way many young people see it, the effects of climate change will be their burden to bear. Young "climate strikers" in Maine say that's why they're walking out of schools Friday and taking to the streets.

Allie Seroussi

Scrolling online to procrastinate sleeping, Allie Seroussi stumbled upon an article her mom’s friend shared on Facebook from a series in The New York Times Magazine called “Losing Earth: The Decade We Almost Stopped Climate Change.”

Robert F. Bukaty / Associated Press

The Conservation Law Foundation says Maine Gov. Janet Mills "walks the walk" when it comes to climate change. Recently she slammed the Trump administration's move to restrict states' ability to regulate their own air quality.  Maine Public's Morning Edition host Irwin Gratz spoke with Mills about what steps she's taken - beyond creating a climate council - to deal with climate change in Maine.

Jennifer Mitchell / Maine Public

More and more schools in Maine are adding solar power to their renewable energy mix. The solar panel array that's just been installed on the roof of Mount Desert Island High School is the largest so far on a public high school in Maine, and will provide more than enough power to meet its demands. Student supporters of the project are hoping that others will be encouraged by its example.

Robert F. Bukaty / AP File

It's often reported that the Gulf of Maine's waters are warming faster than 99 percent of the largest saltwater bodies on the planet. But scientists will tell you the trend can be volatile. This year, for instance, surface water temperatures in the Gulf have been their coolest since 2008. That may be providing some relief for some of the Gulf's historic species, but ongoing climate change means that long-term prospects are still uncertain.

Maine Audubon

A new report in the journal Science indicates that the number of birds in North America has declined by several billion in the past 40 years. The findings, released Thursday, suggest that bird numbers are declining more rapidly than previously thought. And researchers are pointing a finger at habitat loss and climate change.

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