Amita Kelly

Amita Kelly manages national news coverage across NPR.org and other digital platforms.

Previously, she was a digital editor on NPR's Washington Desk, where she managed election, politics, and policy coverage for NPR.org as well as social media and audience engagement.

She was also an editor and producer for NPR's mid-day newsmagazine program Tell Me More, where she covered health, politics, parenting, and, once, how Korea celebrates St. Patrick's Day. Kelly has also worked at Kaiser Health News and NBC News.

Kelly was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Fellow at Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism, where she earned her M.A., and earned a B.A. in English from Wellesley College. She is a native of Southern California, where even Santa surfs.

President Obama is facing deep skepticism in Congress, which votes next month on whether to disapprove the nuclear deal with Iran. The president contends that the public will better appreciate the deal in the years after it has taken effect.

The top 10 Republican presidential candidates, as determined by Fox News, took the stage together for the first time Thursday night in Cleveland. The other seven, who ranked lower in Fox News' analysis of recent polls, debated earlier in the evening.

NPR's politics team hosted a live chat for both debates. The archived chat is below:

This post was updated at 9:30 a.m. ET

The Republican presidential candidates are getting in their last-minute prep before Thursday night's debates. They will be separated into two events — the bottom seven in polls, as determined by a Fox News analysis, will debate at 5 p.m. And the top ten will take the primetime stage at 9 p.m.

In a new video, presidential candidate Ted Cruz has manages to combine one of America's near-universal loves with one of its more contentious pastimes: bacon and guns.

Presidential candidate Mike Huckabee said over the weekend that President Obama's Iran deal is so bad it will "take the Israelis and march them to the door of the oven."

Candidates, politicians and groups were quick to denounce — or defend — the Holocaust reference.

Here's Huckabee's full quote, said in an interview with Breitbart News' editor-in-chief, Alexander Marlow, on Saturday:

Marilyn Mosby, Baltimore's African-American state's attorney, took the spotlight earlier this year when she filed charges against six police officers in her own city. The officers were charged in connection with the death of Freddie Gray, an African-American man who died while in custody.

It was a powerful image to some Baltimore residents — an African-American woman who said she heard where the city's protesters were coming from, but also that she came from a family of police officers and needed the public to let her do her job.

Call it the latest sign of "Bernie-mentum" — Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders' latest event in Madison, Wis., on Wednesday drew an estimated 10,000 supporters. He packed the arena at Veterans Memorial Coliseum in the liberal college town.

Sanders said last month that he was "stunned" by the large crowds showing up for him. Organizers were once shocked by 300 in Iowa, then 5,000 in Minnesota.

President Obama gave a rousing speech Friday at the funeral of state Sen. and Rev. Clementa Pinckney, one of nine people shot at Emanuel AME church in Charleston, S.C., earlier this month.

The president spoke for more than 35 minutes about the reverend's legacy and teachings, and Obama said that he had spent much of the week reflecting on grace.

After the Supreme Court's decision effectively legalizing same-sex marriage nationwide came down at 10 a.m. ET, the 2016 hopefuls weighed in quickly.

The Republican side of the field has opposed same-sex marriage, but in responding to Friday's decision, most of the candidates struck a measured tone — many noting they support traditional marriage and religious freedom and disagree with the court — but also stressed the importance of respect and tolerance for all Americans.

Following the Supreme Court health care ruling to uphold subsidies nationwide, President Obama said Thursday that the Affordable Care Act is "here to stay."

Candidate No. 16 entered the race on Tuesday and he might be the most unconventional one yet — billionaire entrepreneur Donald Trump.

After waving to the crowd from up high in the Trump Tower in New York City, Trump descended to the stage via escalator and made a lengthy, passionate, stream-of-consciousness speech.

Announcing his candidacy for president, Trump promised: "We are going to make our country great again."

"Our country is in serious trouble," he said. "We don't have victories anymore."

Updated at 1:45 p.m. ET

Republican Scott Walker dismissed any controversy over a law he signed in Wisconsin requiring women seeking abortions to get an ultrasound, referring to ultrasounds in an interview on a conservative radio show as "just a cool thing out there."

Presidential candidates are doing what they have to do at this point in the campaign season — they're raising money and strutting their biographies and electoral viability to voters. We haven't heard much yet about policy papers or what they would actually do if they win. But those policy issues will matter — as the campaign picks up steam and especially once the next president steps into the Oval Office on Day 1.

Until Tuesday, it had been almost a month since Hillary Clinton had answered a question from the press.

After taking questions from Iowans in Cedar Rapids, where she spoke about small business, the former secretary of state then answered six questions from reporters. She also took an awkwardly timed one about whether she'll answer questions from media in the middle of the event. The questions after the event ranged from the release of her emails when she was secretary of state and criticism over foreign donations to the Clinton foundation to the state of Iraq and more.

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