Cindy Han

Maine Calling Producer

Cindy’s first foray into journalism after graduating from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism was to intern with CNN in China in the wake of the Tiananmen Square massacre. She then worked in print journalism over the decades, as a factchecker, writer and editor, with publications ranging from the Los Angeles Times Magazine to the magazine of the National Zoo—where she walked past the cheetahs on the way to work each morning—to a food trends magazine. 

 

Her broadcast work has included doing radio news in college and in Taiwan, as well as reporting for a TV public affairs program at WQED in Pittsburgh. Cindy began working as a volunteer with Maine Public Radio’s call-in show Maine Calling when it first went on the air and stuck around until she came on board as a full-time producer in 2018. She sometimes fills in to host the show. She is thrilled to be a part of a program that helps inform, engage and connect people across Maine—and beyond.

 

Before moving to Maine with her husband and three kids, Cindy lived in many different places, growing up in Ohio and Maryland, and later living in New York, Los Angeles, Pittsburgh, and Maryland again. She can’t neglect to mention her family’s dog, Otto, who is shaggy and funny.

Ways to Connect

https://jarcannabis.com/about/

Since legal sales of recreational marijuana began last October, pot has brought in millions in revenue to the state. As demand outstrips supply, we will discuss the status of the market for recreational and medical marijuana in Maine, and what the state policies and regulations are.

Panelists:

Erik Gundersen, director, Maine Office of Marijuana Policy 

Joel Pepin, owner, JAR Cannabis Co.; president of Maine Cannabis Industry Association 

VIP callers:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/napervillemillers/

Parents are dealing with a bevy of challenges during the pandemic, from juggling the demands of work and home life, especially with kids doing remote schooling, to helping everyone in the family cope with anxiety, isolation and health concerns. We'll discuss the range of pandemic-related problems, and get some advice on ways to handle them.

  

Library of America

This program, airing at 7 pm, is a rebroadcast of an earlier show (original air date December 9, 2020); no calls will be taken.  

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and New York Times bestselling author Thomas E. Ricks discusses his new book about the founding fathers and their devotion to the ancient Greek and Roman classics. He wrote First Principles while a visiting fellow in history at Bowdoin College.


https://www.flickr.com/photos/jariceiii/

This is a rebroadcast of an earlier show (original air date January 11, 2021); no calls will be taken.

President-elect Joe Biden has asked Americans to come together and "stop treating opponents as enemies." Is it possible?  We'll examine the historic and sociological roots of the growing polarization that we see all around us--and how it is tied not only to politics, but to people's deeper sense of identity. We'll  discuss what it might take to "heal" the nation.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/jariceiii/

President-elect Joe Biden has asked Americans to come together and "stop treating opponents as enemies." Is it possible?  We'll examine the historic and sociological roots of the growing polarization that we see all around us--and how it is tied not only to politics, but to people's deeper sense of identity. We'll  discuss what it might take to "heal" the nation.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/freestocks/

The 7 pm rebroadcast of this program will be pre-empted due to special NPR coverage of protests at the Capitol in Washington, D.C., over certification of the Presidential election.

With the challenges of 2020 behind us, we look at how different people set goals for the year ahead. We’ll hear from our listeners and some well-known Mainers about their 2021 resolutions. We’ll also talk about why people make or break resolutions, and the role of hope and aspirations, especially during difficult times.


Eastport Arts Center

The COVID-19 crisis continues to wreak havoc on the performing arts throughout Maine. We’ll learn how artists and venues have found creative ways to continue to reach audiences, and hear about plans for 2021. We’ll also discuss what long-term effects the pandemic will have on arts and culture in Maine.

Maine Public

  

Dr. Nirav Shah returns to answer questions about the continuing surge in COVID-19 cases, the start of vaccine distribution in Maine, and what to expect with the state's response to the pandemic in the new year.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/pennstatelive/

This show is only airing at 7 pm—it's a rebroadcast of an earlier show (original air date October 29, 2020); no calls will be taken.  

Of the many side effects that COVID-19 has had on people's wellbeing, sleep often comes up in conversation as something that has been disrupted during the pandemic. We will talk with medical experts about how sleep is integrated with overall mental and physical health, what ways the pandemic is affecting people's sleep (and even their dreams), and approaches that can help foster healthy sleep patterns.


https://www.flickr.com/photos/21546823@N02/

This is a rebroadcast of an earlier show (original air date November 25, 2020); no calls will be taken.

What's the best advice you've ever gotten? Or given? We pose these questions to well-known figures around Maine, as well as to anyone who wants to weigh in, and gain some wisdom about how to approach life.


Maine Memory Network

This is a rebroadcast of an earlier show (original air date November 30, 2020); no calls will be taken.

The four Wabanaki tribes in Maine—Micmac, Maliseet, Penobscot and Passamaquoddy—have been here since long before Europeans arrived and Maine became a state.

We will discuss tribal history in Maine, and learn about the significant challenges and advances among Native Americans in Maine over the years. This is part of our ongoing series of bicentennial shows about Maine's history.

https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/infographic/ripple-effects-atlantic-salmon-conservation

This is a rebroadcast of an earlier show (original air date December 8, 2020); no calls will be taken.

The removal of the Edwards Dam from the Kennebec River — and the Great Works and Veazie Dams from the Penobscot — made national news and ushered in a new era for Maine's sea run fish. But the work is far from over. We'll discuss projects to remove dams, create fish passages and reconstruct culverts all over the state, and what these projects mean for the health of our rivers and streams. This program ties in with the publication of a new book this month about the Penobscot River restoration project.


Bangor Daily News

This show is part of our coverage of topics relating to Maine's bicentennial. It is a rebroadcast of an earlier show (original air date November 2, 2020); no calls will be taken.

One of the most renowned leaders to hail from Maine, Margaret Chase Smith was the first woman to win election to both the U.S. House and U.S. Senate. She made her mark with her independent stances, including legislation on behalf of women in the armed services, and her famous "Declaration of Conscience" speech, criticizing Sen. Joseph McCarthy's red-baiting tactics. We discuss her remarkable life and career, and the relevance of her actions to today's political climate.

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The recent Supreme Court decision that lifted strict Covid-19 restrictions on houses of worship has raised questions about religious gatherings and public health during the pandemic. We talk with representatives from the legal, health and religious perspectives about how the law intersects with public health, and how these conflicts are playing out in Maine.

Kevin Mazur

Noel “Paul” Stookey of the iconic folk trio Peter, Paul and Mary has produced an album showcasing musicians who focus on social change, the mission of a nonprofit that Stookey founded, called Music to Life. We hear from Stookey, who lives in Maine, about his work in promoting social activism through music. Two Maine-based activist-artists join him,and we’ll hear some examples of their music.


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