Cindy Han

Maine Calling Producer

Cindy’s first foray into journalism after graduating from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism was to intern with CNN in China in the wake of the Tiananmen Square massacre. She then worked in print journalism over the decades, as a factchecker, writer and editor, with publications ranging from the Los Angeles Times Magazine to the magazine of the National Zoo—where she walked past the cheetahs on the way to work each morning—to a food trends magazine. 

 

Her broadcast work has included doing radio news in college and in Taiwan, as well as reporting for a TV public affairs program at WQED in Pittsburgh. Cindy began working as a volunteer with Maine Public Radio’s call-in show Maine Calling when it first went on the air and stuck around until she came on board as a full-time producer in 2018. She sometimes fills in to host the show. She is thrilled to be a part of a program that helps inform, engage and connect people across Maine—and beyond.

 

Before moving to Maine with her husband and three kids, Cindy lived in many different places, growing up in Ohio and Maryland, and later living in New York, Los Angeles, Pittsburgh, and Maryland again. She can’t neglect to mention her family’s dog, Otto, who is shaggy and funny.

Ways to Connect

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How are people in Maine of different faiths adapting to the changes brough on by COVID-19? Major religious holidays are being marked in new ways during the current crisis. We talk with faith leaders about how their communities are coping during this time--from altered ways to worship to spiritual guidance on how to find solace and resilience.


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Maine Calling returns to its one-hour format, airing from 1-2 pm and rebroadcast at 7 pm. 

Along with the barrage of information that we get daily about the coronavirus pandemic, there is also a flood of misinformation. We speak with an infectious disease specialist about what's known and unknown about COVID-19--as well as the downright falsehoods that are circulating. We'll also learn about caring for someone with the disease. 

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This is the second segment of a special two-hour Maine Calling, as we cover the issues that affect Mainers during the COVID-19 crisis. For the first segment, click here.

What are some ways to keep informed, educated and entertained while following stay-at-home orders? We learn about some resources to keep you engaged, from websites to videos to books. And we’ll find out how different organizations have found ways to repackage what they do so that you can access them from home.


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This is the first segment of a special two-hour Maine Calling, as we continue to cover the impacts that the COVID-19 pandemic is having on the people of Maine. For the second segment, click here.


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  This is the second segment (2-3 pm) of a special two-hour Maine Calling, as part of our coverage of the impacts that COVID-19 is having on Maine's people.

With Gov. Mills issuing her latest stay-at-home order to combat the spread of coronavirus, and many parks and beaches in Maine closing, how can people still get some fresh air and exercise in Maine's great outdoors? We get some tips of where to go and what to do--and how to be sure you are maintaining safe practicies.


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  This is the first segment of a special two-hour Maine Calling, as we continue to cover the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The global shutdown of travel and other human activity has been the first, massive reduction of resources and emissions to happen on this scale. It's an inadvertent experiment on how climate change could be slowed if everyone in the world curtailed their actions that harm the environment. We discuss what short-term changes have already been measured, and what may happen in terms of long-term changes due to shifts in behavior and global collaboration – or whether these changes are fleeting.


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This is the second segment of a two-hour Maine Calling show, as part of our ongoing coverage of the pressing issues facing Maine during the COVID-19 crisis. For the first segment, click here.

Dr. Edison Liu, president & CEO, The Jackson Laboratory; physician who previously led the scientific response for the country of Singapore for the SARS crisis in 2003. Liu has also had leading positions at the Human Genome Organization and the National Cancer Institute.

Liu joins Maine Calling to talk about his experience leading the response to the SARS epidemic in Singapore, what is needed in the national COVID-19 strategy, how Jackson Lab scientists are helping to combat the pandemic and more. He will answer listener questions about the spread of the virus and safe behavior.

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This is the second segment of a two-hour Maine Calling, as we continue to cover the pressing issues brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. For the first segment, click here.

For many, the current restrictions on day to day life imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic have reached a point where it feels like wartime: limited supplies, staying sheltered, loss of income and ability to carry on with normal behavior. We talk with our state leaders about how public safety and emergency management are addressing this crisis situation in Maine.

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This is an extended two-hour Maine Calling show, as we continue to cover the ways that the COVID-19 crisis is impacting the people of Maine.

All over Maine, people are in need of help — and, at the same time, people are finding ways to help. Today we explore the many creative and generous examples of support and aid that individuals and businesses are offering in this difficult time. We also learn how to best volunteer your services — and how to do so safely.

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This is the second segment of Thursday's 2-hour Maine Calling extended show. For the first segment, click here.

The impacts of the coronavirus pandemic are exacerbated for people who are older, many of whom have added health problems and are more vulnerable to anxiety, isolation, inability to communicate and more. We will talk about what aid and support is available for these older Mainers, and how others can help them.

  This program has been edited for rebroadcast.

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This show will air from 1-3 pm as part of Maine Calling's special coverage of the impacts of COVID-19 on the people of Maine.

With businesses suffering or closing, and people losing their sources of income and livelihoods, what can be done? We speak with Maine's labor and economic leaders to learn how the state is trying to face the challenges of helping to keep workers and businesses afloat amidst the coronavirus emergency.

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This is the second segment of a special two-hour show, airing from 3-4 p.m. (due to a 2 pm live broadcast of a briefing with Maine CDC and Gov. Mills). For the first segment, click here.

With so many unanswerable questions about COVID-19, we are all living in a time of uncertainty, combined with worry over the disease itself, drastic changes in our lifestyles and livelihoods, and a worldwide economic downturn. How do we cope with the anxiety and stress during these difficult times?

  This segment has been edited for rebroadcast.

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This is the first segment of a special two-hour Maine Calling, airing live from 1-2 pm. For the second segment, click here.

With medical attention focused on the coronavirus, and concerns about spread of the disease curtailing interactions between patients and health care providers, we discuss how non-coronavirus health care is being affected. How are mental health treatment, dental care, and other medical issues being addressed?


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This is a special two-hour Maine Calling program in response to the pressing issues facing Maine during the coronavirus crisis. For the first hour, click here.

As Maine feels the life-altering effects of the coronavirus crisis, most workplaces, businesses and schools are shutting down. But this raises a new set of challenges.

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This is a special two-hour Maine Calling program in response to the pressing issues facing Maine during the coronavirus crisis. For the second hour, click here.

As Maine feels the life-altering effects of the coronavirus crisis, most workplaces, businesses and schools are shutting down. But this raises a new set of challenges.

In the first hour of Monday's show, we address the child care dilemma that is facing Maine during this difficult time. Many who must continue to work — from those in the service industry and emergency workers to health care providers — still need care for their young children. Child care centers are finding themselves taking on more children, even as schools are mostly closed at this point. We'll learn how the state and the individual child care centers are addressing the pressing child care issues facing Maine.

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