Nora Flaherty

All Things Considered producer/host

Nora is originally from the Boston area but has lived in Chicago, Michigan, New York City and at the northern tip of New York state. Nora began working in public radio at Michigan Radio in Ann Arbor and has been an on-air host, a reporter, a digital editor, a producer, and, when they let her, played records.

She holds a BA in Latin American Studies from the University of Chicago and an MA in Anthropology from the University of Michigan. She’s received Associated Press, Public Radio News Directors, Inc., Association of Women in Radio and Television, and Edward R. Murrow Awards for her work.

Nora lives in Portland with her husband, their daughter and their two dogs.

Ways to Connect

A program designed to help school-age children access food during school closures caused by the pandemic is set to expire at the end of September if Congress does not take action to extend it.

Maine Equal Justice Partners

The state’s Permanent Commission on the Status of Racial, Indigenous and Maine Tribal Populations is urging the passage of 26 bills as a way to ease racial disparities in the state.

Police are still investigating the death of a 43-year-old Portland woman who was hit by a Brunswick-bound Amtrak train early Tuesday morning as she crossed over the tracks.

Robert F. Bukaty / Associated Press

The Maine Supreme Court is being asked to decide when a petition circulator needs to be a registered voter — before or after they turn in petitions for verification. This might sound narrow, but far more than that is riding on the court’s ruling, because this question is about ranked-choice voting in the presidential election.

Health insurance rates for Mainers who buy individual coverage will be down an average of just over 13% in the coming year.

Elise Amendola / Ap Images

In Maine Public’s series “Lessons From The Pandemic,” we've been talking with Mainers about some of the issues that COVID-19 has revealed in communities around Maine, and the lessons we can learn from them for the future.

Maine opened its online absentee ballot request form Monday morning, and the secretary of state’s office says thousands have already filled it out.

via Summer Allen

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, retail and restaurant owners are still suffering. Many are open or partly open, but cash flow is way down and rent is becoming a major concern.

Good Shepherd Food Bank

The newest COVID-19 stimulus plan that Senate Republicans released Monday would cut supplemental unemployment benefits from $600 to $200 a week. That would impact about 182,000 Mainers, including 46,000 children.

Courtesy Nick Whitney

The Maine Department of Marine Resources has identified Julie Dimperio Holowach, of New York City, as the victim of a shark attack near Bailey Island yesterday. She was pronounced dead after being helped to the shore following the attack.

Nick Sambides Jr. / BDN File

The Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor has announced that it will remove the name of founder C.C. Little from its conference center.

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public file

During the last few months of the pandemic, remote learning has been a challenge for teachers and students.

Maine's labor leaders are calling on Congress to extend the $600 weekly supplemental unemployment benefit for people out of work because of COVID-19. That benefit is part of the CARES act, and it expires at the end of this month.

The U.S. Supreme Court Wednesday upheld the Trump administration's rule allowing employers to opt out of covering contraception, a decision that could affect 70,000 to 126,000 women in the U.S., including many in Maine.

Robert F. Bukaty / AP File

The novel coronavirus has changed the way we think about a lot of issues; the economy is one example. Michael Hillard, a professor of economics at the University of Southern Maine, says wealth inequality has been laid bare by the pandemic and so has the fact that the government is ill-equipped to handle an economic challenge of this size.

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