Nora Flaherty

All Things Considered producer/host

Nora is originally from the Boston area but has lived in Chicago, Michigan, New York City and at the northern tip of New York state. Nora began working in public radio at Michigan Radio in Ann Arbor and has been an on-air host, a reporter, a digital editor, a producer, and, when they let her, played records.

She holds a BA in Latin American Studies from the University of Chicago and an MA in Anthropology from the University of Michigan. She’s received Associated Press, Public Radio News Directors, Inc., Association of Women in Radio and Television, and Edward R. Murrow Awards for her work.

Nora lives in Portland with her husband, their daughter and their two dogs.

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The mayor of Portland, along with several city councilors, have come out against the five referendum that appear on the city’s November ballot.

If passed, the questions would introduce rent control, increase the minimum wage, ban facial recognition technology, implement strict environmental standards for building projects that receive city money and restrict short-term rentals. Mayor Kate Snyder says these are important issues, but they need to be dealt with in a deliberative way, with expert input rather than by a simple yes-or-no vote.

A new analysis of census data by the national Center for Budget and Policy Priorities and Maine Center for Economic Policy finds that about 257,000 Maine adults are having trouble paying their usual household expenses.

umaine.edu

The Harold Alfond Foundation today announced that it was investing half a billion dollars in new grants to aid organizations around the state, with a particular focus on higher education.

David Sharp / Associated Press file

Some appendicitis patients can be treated with antibiotics instead of surgery. That’s according to a new study by about a two dozen hospitals, including Maine Medical Center.

David Goldman / Associated Press/file

Planners and downtown organizations in Maine's three largest cities are preparing for the big changes that will come from the economic fallout of the ongoing pandemic.

Courtesy Cathy Rasco

COVID-19 has taken a huge toll on downtown retail and restaurant businesses all over the country. Some will not survive - and that has experts in Maine looking into the future of the state's downtowns five or 10 years down the road.

A program designed to help school-age children access food during school closures caused by the pandemic is set to expire at the end of September if Congress does not take action to extend it.

Maine Equal Justice Partners

The state’s Permanent Commission on the Status of Racial, Indigenous and Maine Tribal Populations is urging the passage of 26 bills as a way to ease racial disparities in the state.

Police are still investigating the death of a 43-year-old Portland woman who was hit by a Brunswick-bound Amtrak train early Tuesday morning as she crossed over the tracks.

Robert F. Bukaty / Associated Press

The Maine Supreme Court is being asked to decide when a petition circulator needs to be a registered voter — before or after they turn in petitions for verification. This might sound narrow, but far more than that is riding on the court’s ruling, because this question is about ranked-choice voting in the presidential election.

Health insurance rates for Mainers who buy individual coverage will be down an average of just over 13% in the coming year.

Elise Amendola / Ap Images

In Maine Public’s series “Lessons From The Pandemic,” we've been talking with Mainers about some of the issues that COVID-19 has revealed in communities around Maine, and the lessons we can learn from them for the future.

Maine opened its online absentee ballot request form Monday morning, and the secretary of state’s office says thousands have already filled it out.

via Summer Allen

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, retail and restaurant owners are still suffering. Many are open or partly open, but cash flow is way down and rent is becoming a major concern.

Good Shepherd Food Bank

The newest COVID-19 stimulus plan that Senate Republicans released Monday would cut supplemental unemployment benefits from $600 to $200 a week. That would impact about 182,000 Mainers, including 46,000 children.

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