Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman is a reporter and editor, working mainly on breaking news for NPR's digital and radio platforms.

He brings to NPR years of experience as a journalist at a variety of news organizations based all over the world. He came to NPR from The Associated Press in Bangkok, Thailand, where he worked as an editor on the news agency's Asia Desk. Prior to that, Neuman worked in Hong Kong with The Wall Street Journal, where among other things he reported extensively from Pakistan in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. He also spent time with the AP in New York, and in India as a bureau chief for United Press International.

A native Hoosier, Neuman's roots in public radio (and the Midwest) run deep. He started his career at member station WBNI in Fort Wayne, and worked later in Illinois for WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford and WILL in Champaign-Urbana.

Neuman is a graduate of Purdue University. He lives with his wife, Noi, on the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland.

The United States has told Iran that it won't issue a visa to Hamid Aboutalebi, Tehran's controversial choice for the United Nations.

Aboutalebi acknowledges that he served as an interpreter for a group of radical students who seized the U.S. Embassy in Tehran in 1979, taking 52 American diplomats hostage and holding them for 444 days.

The rare move to deny him a visa to take up a diplomatic post comes from the White House after Congress approved legislation authorizing the government to do so.

Here's our earlier post:

A three-judge panel of the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals appeared divided on Thursday as they listened to arguments in a case on whether Utah's same-sex marriage ban is constitutional.

The ban, approved by Utah voters in 2004, was struck down by a lower court in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court ruling last year against the Defense of Marriage Act, or DOMA.

At the hearing in Denver on Thursday, the appeals court judges voiced support for a "fundamental right to marriage" but said Utah might have the right to define marriage as only between men and women.

It's a classic example of supply and demand: How much would you pay for a bottle of fresh air in one of the world's most polluted cities?

When Beijing artist Liang Kegang returned home from a vacation in France, he brought with him a jar of clean air he had collected from Provence. At auction in a group of about 100 fellow artists and collectors, the jar of air fetched the equivalent of $860, according to The Associated Press.

General Motors said on Thursday it will take a charge of $1.3 billion in the first quarter to cover its recall of more than 2 million vehicles, primarily for ignition switch problems.

The announcement comes on the same day that the Detroit automaker said it would need to make additional fixes to the ignition switch mechanism on some of the 2.2 million cars it has already recalled. GM also said it was suspending two engineers with pay in a disciplinary move related to the problem.

The Justice Department says it has found "patterns of excessive force" in the Albuquerque Police Department.

Justice said it found "reasonable cause to believe that APD engages in a pattern or practice of excessive force in violation of the Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution."

A fragment of an ancient Egyptian papyrus known as the "Gospel of Jesus's Wife," unveiled in 2012, shows no evidence of being a modern forgery, as some critics had charged, according to an article published in the Harvard Theological Review.

The scrap of papyrus sparked controversy when it was presented at a conference in Rome some 18 months ago by Harvard professor of divinity Karen L. King.

An Australian plane detected yet another possible signal from the missing Malaysia Airlines jet in the southern Indian Ocean on Thursday, as searchers said they were feeling more confident that the aircraft's flight-data recorder ultimately would be found.

Angus Houston, who is coordinating the search off Australia's west coast, says an Australian air force P-3 Orion, which has been dropping sonar buoys in the search area, picked up a possible signal that may have come from a manmade source.

Apparently bank robbers aren't in the habit of worrying much about grammar and spelling when it comes to writing demand notes.

Not so for the "Good Grammar Bandit," who we might imagine turned to a life of crime because it proved more exciting (and lucrative) than being a copy editor.

After decades on the decline, the number of "stay at home" moms in the U.S. has risen, with 29 percent of women with children under 18 saying they don't work outside the home, according to a new report by the Pew Research Center.

The figure from 2012 is up from 23 percent in 1999.

A 9-month-old Pakistani boy has been charged along with the rest of his family with attempted murder, according to reports.

Musa Khan was photographed last week crying as his grandfather held him for fingerprinting. He was with his family during a protest in a Lahore slum that turned violent in February. Police say the boy, who was 7 months old at the time, threw stones at them.

Toyota Motor Corp. is recalling more than 6 million vehicles spanning nearly 30 models in the U.S., Japan and Europe for a variety of problems, ranging from air bags not deploying to driver's seats not locking properly.

The top-selling RAV4 SUV, Corolla, Yaris and Matrix are among the vehicles being recalled, according to a company statement.

General Motors says it has "fully cooperated" with federal authorities in connection with the recall of 2.6 million cars for defective ignition switches and other problems.

But the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration disagrees and says it will fine the automaker $7,000 for each day it misses a deadline to answer 107 questions that passed on April 4.

On a nature hike along Germany's Baltic Coast in 1913, 20-year-old Richard Platz scrawled a note on a postcard, shoved it into a brown beer bottle, corked it and tossed it into the sea.

Where it traveled, no one knows for sure, but it was pulled out of the Baltic Sea by a fisherman last month not far from where Platz first pitched it.

It's thought to be the world's oldest message in a bottle.

The French news agency Agence France-Presse writes:

It has the look and feel of a fast-paced and riveting science documentary.

The trailer opens with actress Kate Mulgrew (who starred as Capt. Janeway in Star Trek: Voyager) intoning, "Everything we think we know about our universe is wrong." That's followed by heavyweight clips of physicists Michio Kaku and Lawrence Krauss.

There's some new, pristine real estate on the remote Japanese island of Nishino-shima.

Volcanic activity has merged the tiny island with a new neighbor that started to form late last year, creating a single landmass, NASA satellite imagery shows. The island is now a bit more than a half-mile across.

According to NASA:

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