Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman is a reporter and editor, working mainly on breaking news for NPR's digital and radio platforms.

He brings to NPR years of experience as a journalist at a variety of news organizations based all over the world. He came to NPR from The Associated Press in Bangkok, Thailand, where he worked as an editor on the news agency's Asia Desk. Prior to that, Neuman worked in Hong Kong with The Wall Street Journal, where among other things he reported extensively from Pakistan in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. He also spent time with the AP in New York, and in India as a bureau chief for United Press International.

A native Hoosier, Neuman's roots in public radio (and the Midwest) run deep. He started his career at member station WBNI in Fort Wayne, and worked later in Illinois for WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford and WILL in Champaign-Urbana.

Neuman is a graduate of Purdue University. He lives with his wife, Noi, on the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland.

A federal judge has struck down a North Dakota law banning abortions if a fetal heartbeat can be detected, calling the law "invalid and unconstitutional."

The law, passed by lawmakers in the state just over a year ago, bans abortions as early as six weeks into pregnancy and is considered the most restrictive in the country.

The death toll in last month's fatal mudslide in Washington state has risen to 39, officials say, after two more bodies were recovered from the debris.

Search efforts following the mudslide, near the community of Oso in the Cascades foothills, have been hampered by rain and the difficulty in recovering victims from the mudslide on the north fork of the Stillaguamish River on March 22.

Abu Ghraib, the Iraqi prison that became the center of a 2004 prison-abuse scandal during the U.S. occupation, is being closed temporarily because of security concerns, according to the country's Justice Ministry.

The infamous prison, located on the outskirts of Baghdad near Sunni-dominated Anbar province, is being shut because of fears it could be overrun by Sunni insurgents, according to The New York Times.

The New York Police Department said Tuesday it would disband a special unit charged with detecting possible terrorist threats by carrying out secret surveillance of Muslim groups.

The squad that conducted the surveillance, known as the Demographics Unit, was formed in 2003. It brought the NYPD under fire from community groups and activists who accused the force of abusing civil rights and profiling.

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio said his administration has promised "a police force that keeps our city safe, but that is also respectful and fair.

It's not like Saturn needs another moon to look after — it's already got 53 officially, with nine more labeled as "provisional" (and those are just the ones we know about). But the tiny, icy object nicknamed "Peggy" could prove hard to resist.

El Al, Israel's national airline, wants you to get down when you fly UP, its budget carrier that took to the skies just two weeks ago. UP has joined the list of airlines doing away with the boring safety video in favor of something more lively and, at least in this case, delightfully cheesy.

The website FlightClub says:

An ostrich-size South American rhea that's reportedly capable of "seriously injuring humans" escaped from a farm in Hertfordshire, U.K., last month and has been on the lam in the English countryside ever since.

Swimmer Michael Phelps, the most decorated Olympic athlete in history, is coming out of retirement.

Patrick Sandusky, the U.S. Olympic Committee public affairs officer, tweeted this morning: "It is official, Michael Phelps is back.... competing next week in Arizona."

Phelps, who will be 29 in June, has already competed in four Olympic Games, winning 22 medals, including 18 gold. There is no word yet on whether he's looking to compete in the 2016 Summer Games in Rio.

There's a half-kilometer stretch of road in the Netherlands that looks a bit like something out of the movie Tron, thanks to new luminescent markings that glow green in the dark.

The photoluminescent paint, a sort of amped-up version of what is found on many wristwatches, charges up during daylight hours and then emits the green hue at night along the short test patch of N329 highway in Oss, according to Dutch companies Studio Roosegaarde and Heijmans, a road construction firm.

Police in France are taking DNA samples from more than 500 male high school students in western France in hopes of identifying the person who raped a 16-year-old girl.

The assault reportedly occurred at a private Roman Catholic school in La Rochelle on the Atlantic coast on Sept. 30. Investigators are trying to match DNA found on the victim's clothing, the BBC says.

It's looking like clouds will obscure Monday night's lunar eclipse for nearly all of the U.S. East Coast, but much of the West and Midwest should be able to see it.

Barely half of millennials say they look to religion for guidance, but a higher percentage "talk to God," suggesting that the 18-to-34 demographic is more spiritual than sectarian, according to a new survey by the Integrated Innovation Institute at Carnegie Mellon University.

The survey of 2,000 U.S. men and women, ages 18-34, found that 62 percent said they talk to God, while 52 percent said they look to religion for guidance.

If you're willing to stay up late and the skies are clear early next week, you can catch the first total lunar eclipse in more than three years that's visible throughout North America.

The total eclipse, the first visible throughout the U.S. since December 2012, will peak at about 3 a.m. EDT.

As the saying goes, "In God We Trust, all others pay cash."

But in the case of Russian immigrant and businessman God Gazarov, cash may be the only option.

That's because, according to The New York Post, credit reporting agency Equifax has refused to acknowledge that he has any financial history whatsoever, despite having high scores with two other major credit agencies.

The United States has told Iran that it won't issue a visa to Hamid Aboutalebi, Tehran's controversial choice for the United Nations.

Aboutalebi acknowledges that he served as an interpreter for a group of radical students who seized the U.S. Embassy in Tehran in 1979, taking 52 American diplomats hostage and holding them for 444 days.

The rare move to deny him a visa to take up a diplomatic post comes from the White House after Congress approved legislation authorizing the government to do so.

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