Susan Sharon

Deputy News Director

Deputy News Director Susan Sharon is an experienced newsroom leader and reporter who has worked in both radio and television.  She's covered a wide range of subjects including politics, environmental policy, the opioid crisis and criminal justice as well as human interest stories.  Her work has been nationally recognized by the Society of Professional Journalists, Public Radio News Directors, Inc and by the Society of Environmental Journalists for breaking news, enterprise and beat reporting.

Susan is a graduate of the University of Montana School of Journalism. She's received additional training in management, newsroom leadership and editing from Central Maine Community College, Poynter and NPR..

Got a story idea? E-mail Susan: ssharon@mainepublic.org. You can also follow her on twitter @susansharon1

Ways to Connect

Susan Sharon / Maine Public

For more than 50 years, Outward Bound expeditions have helped thousands of students undertake challenges and master skills in the outdoors that they never thought they could. Along the way, participating teens and adults have discovered the joys of adventure and teamwork, but programs generally have not been designed for seniors. But the Hurricane Island Outward Bound School in Camden has begun rethinking that practice by offering a short course for women 65 and over.

J. David Ake / Associated Press/file

Maine’s attorney general has joined more than two dozen states and local governments in a lawsuit against the Trump administration over its plan to roll back clean air protections.

Every summer, a handful of interns and research assistants are selected from hundreds of applicants to camp in primitive conditions on a tiny, treeless island several miles off Maine's coast. Their job description calls for "a sense of humor and love ... of adventure, the outdoors and birds."

The coveted jobs are with the National Audubon Society's Project Puffin, an unusual seabird restoration project that got its start on Eastern Egg Rock in the 1970s.

Brian Bechard / Maine Public

Every summer, a handful of interns and research assistants are selected from hundreds of applicants to camp in primitive conditions on a tiny, treeless island several miles off midcoast Maine. Their job description calls for “a sense of humor” and love of “adventure, the outdoors and birds.”


A new rule that limits referrals by abortion providers will not take effect in Maine or any other state, due to a Federal Appeals Court action.

Susan Sharon / Maine Public

It took a historic decision by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and an unusual collaboration between environmental groups, the city of Augusta and the state of Maine to remove the Edwards Dam. But 20 years later, the hard-fought effort is being replicated and celebrated around the country as native, sea-run fish, bald eagles and other wildlife continue to return to the Kennebec River.

Office of Gov. Janet Mills

Over the past week, Gov. Janet Mills has signed into law dozens of bills passed by the Maine lawmakers this session. For the two African American members of the Legislature, a pair of bills in particular stand out.

This story is part of Maine Public’s Deep Dive on child care. To see the rest of the series, visit mainepublic.org/childcare.

Maine Public’s Deep Dive: Childcare in Maine is made possible, in part, by the John T. Gorman Foundation and United Way's Women United.

Maine Public File

A Maine State Prison inmate has filed a class-action lawsuit against the Department of Corrections and Wellpath LLC, a private contractor that provides medical care to prisoners.

Susan Sharon / Maine Public

With a week left until their two-year contract expires, state workers rallied outside the State House Saturday to demand pay raises as a way to address what they say are pervasive recruitment and retention problems throughout state government.

Robert F. Bukaty / AP Photo

Tribal leaders, lawmakers and environmental groups are praising passage of a bill, signed into law by Gov. Janet Mills Friday, that establishes water quality standards for sustenance fishing in tribal waters.

Susan Sharon / Maine Public

A Maine Supreme Court justice will allow a 13-year-old boy who has been found mentally incompetent to stand trial to remain at the Long Creek Youth Development Center in South Portland until alternative placement can be found.

Susan Sharon / Maine Public

An unusual civil trial is underway this week in Kennebec County Superior Court, in a case brought by a Maine State prison inmate against the Department of Corrections.

Susan Sharon / Maine Public

The number of women incarcerated in Maine is rising fast. In the past six years the number of female inmates at the Maine Correctional Center (MCC) in Windham has grown from about 150 to more than 220, as of April. And the state Department of Corrections has a problem: the overcrowded women's facility is housed in a men's prison.

Susan Sharon / Maine Public - File

Juvenile justice advocates say kids in Maine are serving longer sentences in prison for petty, non-violent offenses than adults who commit misdemeanors do. And they say the time kids spend in detention comes at a high financial cost and result in poor and even traumatic outcomes.

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