2 PM Public Affairs Programs

Monday - Friday at 2 PM

The 2:00 PM hour-long block of public affairs programs on Maine Public Radio is a mix of different programs produced around the globe. Please note that the broadcast schedule is subject to change. Updates are made as soon as practical.

For more information on the programs featured in the 2:00 pm public affairs time slot please see the full Maine Public Radio schedule

If you can't find what you're looking for please email Audience Services or call 1-800-884-1717.

Monday, September 21 at 2:00 pm

Universal Basic Income: Does it Work?

Here’s the story that New England tells itself: Racism is a Southern problem.

But our region’s abolitionist past hides a darker history of racism, slavery and segregation. It’s a legacy that lives with us today. 

Friday, September 18 at 2:00 pm

Racism In New England

New England’s abolitionist past hides a darker history of slavery in the region. It’s a legacy that still affects communities across the region, from housing and education to health outcomes for people of color.

Thursday, September 17 at 2:00 pm

Governor Janet Mills, Health and Human Services Commissioner Jeanne Lambrew and Dr. Nirav D. Shah, Director of the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention, will provide Maine’s COVID-19 media briefing to answer questions on Maine’s public health response to COVID-19.

 

Wednesday, September 16 at 2:00 pm

Gen Z and the Future of Democracy

Tuesday, September 15 at 2:00 pm

Dr. Nirav D. Shah, Director of the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention, will brief the media and answer questions about COVID-19.

Monday, September 14 at 2:00 pm

Living With Fire

Friday, September 11 at 2:00 pm

NEXT is a weekly radio show and podcast about New England, one of America's oldest places, at a time of change. It's hosted by John Dankosky at WNPR in Hartford, Connecticut.

With New England as our laboratory, NEXT asks questions about how we power our society, how we move around, and how we adapt. It's about trends that provide us challenges and present us with new opportunities. New England has old rules and customs, with well-worn pathways forged centuries ago, and its population is aging fast.

Thursday, September 10 at 2:00 pm

Dr. Nirav D. Shah, Director of the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention, will brief the media and answer questions about COVID-19.

Wednesday, September 9 at 2:00 pm

One Small Step: Courageous Conversations Across A Growing Divide -- A Special Hour From NPR and StoryCorps

Tuesday, September 8 at 2:00 pm

Dr. Nirav D. Shah, Director of the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention, will brief the media and answer questions about COVID-19.

Monday, September 7 at 2:00 pm

Will Democratic Capitalism Survive?

As inequality rises around the world, some citizens are losing faith in the liberal democratic capitalism that emerged in the 20th century. Protests from the United States to Belarus share themes of resentment towards economic policies that are seen as inherently unfair. Stanford University’s Larry Diamond and Francis Fukuyama join Ray Suarez and Philip Yun to discuss what’s at stake for liberal democracy and the changing world order.

Friday, September 4 at 2:00 pm

NEXT is a weekly radio show and podcast about New England, one of America's oldest places, at a time of change. It's hosted by John Dankosky at WNPR in Hartford, Connecticut.

With New England as our laboratory, NEXT asks questions about how we power our society, how we move around, and how we adapt. It's about trends that provide us challenges and present us with new opportunities. New England has old rules and customs, with well-worn pathways forged centuries ago, and its population is aging fast.

Thursday, September 3 at 2:00 pm

Dr. Nirav D. Shah, Director of the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention, will brief the media and answer questions about COVID-19.

Wednesday, September 2 at 2:00 pm

What the Words Say

Everyone agrees that the goal of reading instruction is for children to understand what they read. The question is: how does a little kid get there?

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