All Things Considered with Nora Flaherty

4 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. Monday - Friday

Weekdays at 4 p.m. join host Nora Flaherty and hear Maine’s only daily statewide radio news program. Maine Public Radio's award-winning news staff brings you the latest news from across Maine and the region, as well as in-depth reports on the most important issues.

Photos by J. Scott Applewhite and Robert F. Bukaty / Associated Press

Maine’s two House members and two Senators are staking out different positions on the impeachment question.

Amy Meredith / Flickr Creative Commons

A timber company wants to pull the plug on a massive development plan for Moosehead Lake that was years in the making and approved a decade ago, but that never got off the ground.

Hilton Hafford

Around the country, concerns are being raised in television ads about the use of one of the most widely-used herbicides: "If you or someone you know has been diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma after being exposed to Roundup or a glyphosate herbicide, call now."

Barbara Cariddi / Maine Public

Maine is now home to dozens of invasive species of plants and insects. These are species that didn’t evolve here, and now they’re threatening plants that did. And that threat extends to the native insects, birds and other living things that depend on those plants.

Fred Bever / Maine Public File

In 30 years, the Gulf of Maine will have been transformed by climate change. Its waters will inexorably grow warmer, and the species that flourish there will be those that can adapt. The same might be said for the Mainers who make their living from the sea. The future of the state's marine economy may well belong to those who can adapt.

Robert Bukaty / AP File

The Trump Administration has been active with efforts to roll back some parts of federal clean air laws, which govern everything from coal-fired electric plants to motor vehicle emissions. In many cases, the efforts have been made through rule making. Some state attorneys general, including Maine’s, have joined together in trying to block those changes.

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

From Portland to Norway and Bar Harbor, thousands of teens across Maine left their schools Friday to demand action on climate change.

Patty Wight / Maine Public

This week Maine Public is focusing coverage on climate change, and threats it poses to Maine and to the planet. Among those threats is an increasing number of tick-borne diseases. Researchers say warmer winters and rising humidity have helped fuel the northward expansion of the ticks' range. Changes in climate are also making Maine more hospitable for new species of ticks and the diseases they carry.

Robert F. Bukaty / AP File

It's often reported that the Gulf of Maine's waters are warming faster than 99 percent of the largest saltwater bodies on the planet. But scientists will tell you the trend can be volatile. This year, for instance, surface water temperatures in the Gulf have been their coolest since 2008. That may be providing some relief for some of the Gulf's historic species, but ongoing climate change means that long-term prospects are still uncertain.

Maine Audubon

A new report in the journal Science indicates that the number of birds in North America has declined by several billion in the past 40 years. The findings, released Thursday, suggest that bird numbers are declining more rapidly than previously thought. And researchers are pointing a finger at habitat loss and climate change.

The Nature Conservancy

This week we’ve been reporting on climate change and its effects on Maine, but there are those who dispute that climate change is real or that it is caused by human activity. To help depolarize the debate, The Nature Conservancy has created a how-to guide for talking with family, friends or colleagues who doubt the reality of climate change.

State Director Kate Dempsey spoke with Maine Public’s Ed Morin for Here and Now:

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

In northern Maine, the Aroostook Band of Micmacs has for decades been trying to protect important tribal cultural resources, including traditional foods, from pollution. And warming temperatures are expected to further that threat. But the Micmacs and other Maine tribes are taking steps to adapt.

Patty Wight / Maine Public

This summer’s media coverage of several dogs that died shortly after swimming in water tainted by toxic algae has brought public attention to the phenomenon of algal blooms. Federal agencies consider them an emerging public health issue and a major environmental problem across the U.S.

Mal Leary / Maine Public

The activist group Mainers for Health and Parental Rights has submitted some 78,000 signatures certified by local registrars to suspend the state’s new vaccine law until the voters have their say on the issue next spring. Supporters of the law are vowing a fight to keep it.

Eric Gray / AP

In August, the Pew Research Center released a poll showing a sharp increase in the number of Americans who view climate change as a major threat to the well-being of the country ⁠— from 40 percent in 2013 to 57 percent now. And it is of particular concern to Democratic voters, as reflected by the emergence of climate change as a leading issue in the 2020 Democratic presidential primary.

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