Morning Edition

Monday - Friday 6:00 am - 9:00 am

Every weekday for more than three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country. Irwin Gratz and the Maine Public Radio News team bring you regional updates throughout the morning.

Robert F. Bukaty / Associated Press

On Monday, Maine Gov. Janet Mills announced new rules for tourists coming to Maine amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Instead of abiding by a 14-day quarantine, visitors seeking lodging will need to certify that they've had at least one negative COVID-19 test - with some exceptions.

Jennifer Mitchell / Maine Public

A prisoner at the Bolduc Correctional Facility in Warren has filed a federal lawsuit against the Mills administration for withholding unemployment benefits from him and other prisoners in a work release program.

Fred Bever / Maine Public

More than a dozen police chiefs from the Greater Portland area, as well as the state’s Commissioner of Public Safety, called a press conference Wednesday to pledge support for protests in the name of George Floyd, who died under the knee of a Minneapolis police officer. But they also condemned violence and vandalism that have surfaced on the fringes of otherwise peaceful activism.

The Maine Department of Corrections is conducting a second round of coronavirus testing at the Maine Correctional Center in Windham.

Jennifer Mitchell

Bare spots on store shelves serve as a reminder that this has not been an ordinary year. While there is plenty of meat being produced by farmers, they have had trouble getting their meat processed due to outbreaks of COVID-19 at processing plants.

Todd Eaton

Ninety-seven percent of businesses in Maine have fewer than 20 employees, according to the Small Business Administration. Many operate on tight margins, even during good economic times. But now, as the pandemic and its effects linger, some of those small businesses are now being forced to shut their doors for good.

Keith Shortall / Maine Public

Many workers in Maine’s hospitality industry continue to face an uncertain future, even as the state begins to gradually reopen for the summer.

Willis Ryder Arnold / Maine Public

The coronavirus pandemic is affecting many people's lives. To minimize those effects, Congress has appropriated trillions of dollars of spending to aid Americans. That money is going to have to be borrowed by a government already running huge deficits. How will that be possible? And what will it mean for the country in the long term? 

Robert F. Bukaty / Associated Press/file

Four years ago, Maine voters approved a ballot initiative legalizing recreational marijuana. Yet, there are still no marijuana retailers in the state. The industry's roll-out since since 2016 has been impeded by a number of legislative and regulatory twists and turns, including a gubernatorial veto.  But few, if any, in this emerging sector anticipated the latest obstacle.

Robert F. Bukaty / AP File

Following months of record low unemployment, the country is now facing unprecedented jobless numbers. It's part of the economic fallout from COVID-19. It's been a rough year for college seniors who, until a couple of months ago, were on track to enter a swift job market.

Colby College in Waterville is taking the rather sizable task of finding each of its graduates a job. Maine Public's Jennifer Mitchell talked about this with Colby College President David Greene. 

School buildings in Maine are closed through at the least the end of the academic year, classes have moved online and families are trying to teach their kids at home — with mixed results. What happens over the summer and even into next fall is also still in question.

State and local governments have been front and center in the U.S. as we face the coronavirus pandemic. That is especially true because of inconsistent messaging from the Trump administration, and the fact that the federal government has not met states' needs for testing and medical equipment. So how has Maine responded since our first case of COVID-19, which was nearly two months ago?

The coronavirus has changed all of our lives, and this month Maine Public is looking at some of the big emerging issues here, including the state’s public health response to the virus, its impact on the economy and education during social distancing.

For more than a month, Maine has confronted the coronavirus, which is affecting all Maine people. Mainers living through this coronavirus economic slowdown are getting a glimpse of what happened in the Great Depression. Unemployment is soaring. Many are having trouble paying bills. Food pantries are seeing spikes in visits.

Wild Oats Bakery and Cafe

Restaurants were some of the first businesses closed due to COVID-19, and the timing couldn't have been worse for Wild Oats Bakery & Cafe in Brunswick. The cafe was in the middle of a building project and trying to move to a new location when the town issued its stay-at-home order.

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