ACLU of Maine

BDN

Over the past several weeks, agents from U.S. Customs and Border Protection have carried out random stops of people to question them about their citizenship, miles away from the nearest border.

On June 21, two Bangor Daily News reporters, recorded audio from a Maine checkpoint on I-95 and posted it on the paper's website.

The policy isn't new. It's based on rules put in place in 1952  that allow the agency to randomly stop people within 100 miles of any U.S. "external boundary."

Patty Wight / Maine Public

The U.S. Border Patrol is running daily citizenship checks on buses traveling from Fort Kent toward the state's interior and making periodic checks on buses originating in Bangor. Civil rights advocates say these checks may be in violation of protections outlined in the U.S. Constitution.

Daniel Heibert, chief patrol agent for the Houlton sector, says the agency has the authority to make such checks anywhere within 100 miles of the border, a standard which encompasses the entire state of Maine.

Maine Public/file

PORTLAND, Maine - The American Civil Liberties Union of Maine, along with five other New England ACLU affiliates, has filed a lawsuit against the Department of Homeland Security and U.S. Customs and Border Protection over President Trump's Muslim travel bans.

Steve Mistler / Maine Public

At noon today, Donald J. Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States.

PORTLAND, Maine - The American Civil Liberties Union of Maine has filed a lawsuit on behalf of a Bar Harbor couple who were arrested after trying to film police officers in Portland.

The lawsuit filed on Tuesday in the Hancock County Superior Court against Benjamin Noyes of the Portland Police Department says the couple's arrest was illegal and unconstitutional.

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