bicentennial

Portland Museum of Art

This show is part of Maine Calling's ongoing coverage of topics relating to Maine's bicentennial.

Marking the September 25th opening of a major exhibit on artists Winslow Homer and Frederic Remington at the Portland Museum of Art, we examine the significance of Homer's work and his time in Maine. The seminal period in Homer's career spent living and painting on Maine's rocky coast have produced some of the paintings that are considered masterpieces in American art--and defining images of Maine.


mainememory.net

This is a rebroadcast of an earlier show (original air date July 29, 2020); no calls will be taken.  

This show is part of our ongoing coverage of topics relating to Maine's bicentennial, and is the fourth in our series on the history of Maine.

The years from World War I through World War II led to lasting changes in Maine. We'll learn about how the efforts of those on the homefront altered Maine's landscape and industries. We'll also talk about notable Maine leaders of that era, and what impacts the wars and those who fought in them had on Maine's future.


American Folklife Center

This show is part of our ongoing coverage of topics relating to Maine's bicentennial.

A Maine music historian joins us to look back at the remarkable music that’s been made in Maine over the past 200 years. This includes music from: the Wabanaki and Passamaquoddy tribes; a Pulitzer Prize-winning composer, Walter Piston of Rockland; the country’s first superstar teen idol, Rudy Vallee; country music stars Donald Doane, Sr., and the Katahdin Mountaineers; folk music pioneers such as Mellie Dunham; Hermann Kotzschmar and the Merrill Auditorium organ named in honor of him; and many more.

Guest: Aaron Robinson, award–winning American composer, conductor, musicologist and best-selling author

https://www.flickr.com/photos/sloalan/

This show is part of our ongoing coverage of topics relating to Maine's bicentennial.

What is the geologic makeup and history of Maine? We find out what geologists know--and how they learn--about Maine's bedrock formations and how periods of erosion, mountain-building,  metamorphism and other activity have led to what we have today. A combination of rock types distinguishes our state, from half a billion years ago until today. We will also hear about the new Mineral & Gem Museum—what they feature, and what gems and minerals are unique to Maine. 

  •  Bob Marvinney, Maine State Geologist
  • William “Skip” Simmons, Research Director Maine Mineral and Gem Museum; University of New Orleans Emeritus Professor of Mineralogy and University Research Professor 

mainememory.net

This show is part of our ongoing coverage of topics relating to Maine's bicentennial, and is the fourth in our series on the history of Maine.

The years from World War I through World War II led to lasting changes in Maine. We'll learn about how the efforts of those on the homefront altered Maine's landscape and industries. We'll also talk about notable Maine leaders of that era, and what impacts the wars and those who fought in them had on Maine's future.


https://francesperkinscenter.org/life-new/

Frances Perkins, whose roots were in Maine, is remembered as “the woman behind the New Deal.” As FDR’s Secretary of Labor and the first woman to serve as a cabinet secretary, Perkins was the driving force behind the policies that pulled the nation out of The Great Depression of the 1930s. We discuss how her pioneering work on behalf of the rights of workers and the middle class is relevant today, as we face a similarly dire economic crisis due to the pandemic. This show is part of our ongoing covering of topics relating to Maine’s bicentennial.

Rebecca Conley / Maine Public

Maine's bicentennial celebration has been muted by the coronavirus pandemic. But, 100 years ago this weekend, despite the Spanish flu, the state celebrated its centennial.

https://www.mainememory.net/

This is a rebroadcast of an earlier show (original air date May 26, 2020); no calls will be taken. 

We continue our celebration of Maine’s 200th statehood anniversary by examining Maine from the time of the Civil War to the end of the Great War. This is part of our year-long bicentennial series of shows covering Maine history.


https://www.flickr.com/photos/mjpicsde/

A newly published cookbook commemorates Maine's bicentennial by compiling recipes from Mainers all around the state. We'll talk about Maine's food heritage -- and also get creative ideas for cooking during the pandemic.


https://www.mainememory.net/

We continue our celebration of Maine’s 200th statehood anniversary by examining Maine from the time of the Civil War to the end of the Great War. This is part of our year-long bicentennial series of shows covering Maine history.


historic lithograph exhibited at Bowdoin College Museum of Art

This is a rebroadcast of an earlier show (original air date Feb 21, 2020); no calls will be taken. This show is part of Maine Calling's ongoing coverage of topics relating to Maine's bicentennial.

In this segment, our panel of historians explains how Maine evolved in the pivotal years between becoming a state in 1820 through Maine's involvement in the Civil War. We'll learn about the pivotal figures of the day, and how Maine's cultural, economic and political landscape evolved during the 19th century. 


Maine Public

Maine Secretary of State Matt Dunlap joins us to talk about the change to the primary date, safety at polling sites, election security, the impact of stay-at-home orders on Maine's independent candidates, changes to how the Bureau of Motor Vehicles is operating because of the crisis, and the work his office is doing with Maine State archives in celebration of the bicentennial.

AUGUSTA, Maine - A commission supporting bicentennial festivals and projects around Maine has awarded more than $400,000 in grants.

https://www.mainememory.net/artifact/153

This is a rebroadcast of an earlier show (original air date January 9, 2020); no calls will be taken.


Maine Historical Society

In 1820, the U.S. passed an act that made participation on the slave trade an act of piracy. Yet, dozens of Maine vessels engaged in the slave trade illegally during this period. Thousands of enslaved people were transported and traded, leading to huge profits for slave traders--some of whom were Maine sea captains who are remembered as leading citizens of the day. Much of the millions of dollars from the slave trade funded the growth of New England's economy. We will learn about this troubling period in Maine's history, which has not often been mentioned or understood.

This show is part of Maine Calling's coverage of topics relating to Maine's Bicentennial.