Bureau of Economic Analysis

Mainers' personal income jumped by 41 percent in the April-to-June quarter, according to the federal Bureau of Economic Analysis.  The two main reasons:  federal stimulus spending and state unemployment benefits.

It didn't take long for the new coronavirus to slow Maine's economy.  The federal Bureau of Economic Analysis says Maine's gross domestic product shrank at a 6.3% rate in the first quarter of this year.

Before the pandemic hit, Mainers personal income was on the rise.  That's according to federal Bureau of Economic Analysis, which reported Tuesday that Mainers' personal income rose 3.1% in the first quarter of this year.

The personal income of Mainers jumped 5.4% in the 1st quarter of this year. It was the third biggest gain in personal income in the U.S.  

Maine's economic growth slowed markedly in the 4th quarter of 2018.  According to the federal Bureau of Economic Analysis, Maine's Gross Domestic Product (GDP) grew at a rate of just 0.7 percent during the final three months of last year.

The federal government is out with new figures showing how fast Maine's metropolitan area economies grew in 2017. 

Maine's economic growth accelerated in the third quarter of last year. The federal Bureau of Economic Analysis says the state's gross domestic product - or GDP - was growing at a 3.2 percent annual rate in the July-to-September quarter.

The federal government reported Tuesday that Maine’s economy grew at a 2 percent annual rate in the second quarter of this year.  

The Gross Domestic Product - or GDP - as it’s known, is the measure of all goods and services produced in the state.  Maine’s 2 percent figure was down from the 2.4 percent growth logged in the first quarter of this year.  In dollars, Maine’s GDP in the second quarter was $61.006 billion.

The growth in Maine residents' personal income slowed in the second quarter. 

That's according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis.  The federal agency's latest numbers show that Mainers' personal income rose six-tenths of a percent, slower than the 1.6 percent growth seen in the first quarter of the year.

The slight increase for Maine was almost exactly in line with the national growth rate - seven-tenths of a percent.

Most of the second quarter's increase came from Mainer's wages, or dividend and interest payments.  

New figures are out on the economic health of Maine's three urban areas, based on the change last year in the gross domestic product. 

The Bureau of Economic Analysis figures show that Bangor's output grew by 1.4 percent, Portland-South Portland by 1.6 percent, and Lewiston-Auburn by 1.8 percent. 

That was a big turnaround for Lewiston-Auburn, which actually saw its economic output shrink in 2015. 

But the latest numbers reflect a slowing of economic output growth in greater Portland, which posted a 2.4 percent increase in the GDP in 2015.

Maine ended last year with sluggish economic growth.  

Figures from the Bureau of Economic Analysis show that the state's gross domestic product grew by a rate of less than 1 percent - seven-tenths of a percent - in the fourth quarter of 2016.  

That was slightly better than the four-tenths of a percent growth rate in the third quarter, but well shy of the more than 3 percent growth rate the state generated in the final quarter of 2015.

PORTLAND, Maine - Federal figures indicate that Maine's economy grew just over half a percent between April and June of this year.

That's less than New England as a whole, and the U.S. as a whole, both of which grew between 1 and 2 percent.

PORTLAND, Maine - Maine's economy grew sluggishly in the fourth quarter of 2015. Statistics released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis - or BEA - show the state's Gross Domestic Product grew at a 1.3 percent annual rate during the last three months of the year.

That figure lagged the overall U.S. growth rate of 1.7 percent in the fourth quarter, and was below the New England average growth rate of 2.1 percent.