infrastructure

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Planners are always thinking about the things that many people take for granted in their daily lives: roads, utilities, the types and location of housing and job opportunities. Planners are also fully engaged with the big issues facing Maine: energy, quality of place, demographics, 21st century infrastructure (broadband access), jobs for kids who have to move away for work after high school or college. Join us to learn about the work of Maine municipal planners.

This show will be rebroadcast at 9 p.m. (instead of the usual 8 p.m. repeat).

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In his campaign and first year in office, President Donald Trump promised a major infrastructure program to address the nation’s backlog of needed repairs. 

President Trump will finally be unveiling his long-awaited $1.5 trillion plan to repair and rebuild the nation's crumbling highways, bridges, railroads, airports, seaports and water systems Monday. But, the proposal will not be one that offers large sums of federal funding to states for infrastructure needs, but it is instead a financing plan that shifts much of the funding burden onto the states and onto local governments.

With the U.S. facing an almost trillion dollar backlog of unmet highway and bridge needs, Maine U.S. Senator Susan Collins chaired a Senate subcommittee hearing today Wednesday exploring how to improve the nation’s infrastructure.

Among those joining Collins at the hearing in Washington was Maine Transportation Commissioner David Bernhardt, who’s heading a national association of transportation officials. Bernhardt told the panel that assured federal funding is very important.

PORTLAND, Maine - Maine U.S. Sen. Susan Collins is chairing a Senate hearing today on how the country should deal with its deteriorated infrastructure. 

Joining her at the Washington hearing is Maine Transportation Commissioner David Bernhardt, who's heading a national association of transportation officials.

Bernhardt spoke of the importance assured federal funding.

Maine's Infrastructure

Feb 27, 2017
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A recent report card from the Maine chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers found that the overall condition of Maine’s infrastructure has not improved in the past four years – and in some cases, is getting worse.  This includes roads and bridges, schools, airports, water systems and public transportation.  We’ll look at the most critical areas and prospects for improving Maine’s infrastructure.

AUGUSTA, ME_ Transportation experts say Maine is among states spending too little on highway and bridge maintenance.