local

The Local Motive title still
video.vermontpbs.org

Maine Public TV Air Times:
Thur., July 12 at 10:00 pm
Sat., July 14 at 11:00 am

The food you don't eat on your plate still has value as a resource with applications in other areas: on the farm, as rescued food, as feed for animals, and as anaerobic digesters. Think of it as resource management. This episode looks at food that may be slated to be thrown away as a possible resource with other applications. Explore the challenges of managing each stage of the hierarchy and the impending complications surrounding the implementation of Act 148, Vermont's universal recycling law which also addresses composting.

Customers at a farmer's market in Vermont
video.vermontpbs.org

Maine Public TV Air Time:
Thur., July 5 at 10:30 pm
Sat., July 7 at 11:30 am

Who is the local food consumer and what are the roadblocks to getting them to eat more local? While price is the most talked about obstacle, it's only the tip of the iceberg. People who buy local food today are making a values-based purchase paying more to eat something they feel is healthier, better tasting and better for the local economy. This episode looks at how consumers arrive at the decision to eat local, and how to shift the conversation away from price and toward the benefits of making that buying decision.

A woman picking out produce at a market in Vermont
vermontvacation.com

Maine Public TV Air Times:
Thur., July 5 at 10:00 pm
Sat., July 7 at 11:00 am

Institutions such as schools, universities, camps, hospitals and prisons are places where the food consumer often doesn't have much choice. This is food intended to feed large volumes, and has to do so with typically small per capita budgets, USDA nutritional requirements and limited labor and equipment resources. To reach Farm to Plate goals in increasing local consumption, these institutions need to choose local food for their consumer. We'll look at the paths to bringing local food into institutions and the passionate individuals committed to making Farm to Institution a reality.

The Local Motive title still
video.vermontpbs.org

Maine Public TV Air Time:
Thur., May 31 at 10:30 pm

Direct sales from farmer to consumer are great and desirable, but the majority of families still get their food from grocers, supermarkets, general stores and restaurants. This episode looks at how third party distributors and innovations in cooperative distribution are helping clear the roadblocks to the successful scaling of local food, giving farmers new opportunities. We'll also see how distribution is one particularly pronounced way that strong relationships can help create success at all scales.

The Local Motive title still
video.vermontpbs.org

Maine Public TV Air Time:
Thur., May 31 at 10:00 pm

Explore the relationship between the processing of local food and the financial viability of the local food system, both for producers and consumers. Processing increases shelf life, minimizes waste and improves access to market. It is also economically valuable and necessary to serve the demands of current consumers. In order for farmers to be economically viable and feasible in the current market, they need access to processing facilities and processing partners.

farmer in a field of crops
youtube.com

Maine Public TV Air Times:
Thur., May 3 at 10:30 pm
Sat., May 5 at 11:30 am
Sat., May 19 at 11:30 am

Vermont leads the nation in local food production and consumption. Even so, as it currently stands only about 7% of our food is sourced locally. The Vermont Farm to Plate food system plan calls for a goal of 10% local food consumption by 2020. The New England Food Vision seeks to achieve 50% of all food consumption in New England to be sourced locally by mid-century. Episode 1 examines these goals, looking at how Vermont currently eats, the supply and demand challenges, and how much land would be needed to attain long-term goals.

A still frame from 1000 Feet and Below
vimeo.com

Maine Public TV Air Times:
Thur., Feb. 22 at 10:30 pm
Sat., Feb. 24 at 11:30 am

Explore the existing small ski areas of Maine. It will discover the history of Maine skiing and the community spirit that is alive and well at these small ski areas.

For more viewing options and information about the production visit the film-maker's Facebook page.

Growing Local video still
vimeo.com

Maine Public TV Air Times:
Thur., March 23 at 10:00 pm
Sat., March 25 at 11:00 am

While "buying local" is on the rise, the stories in Growing Local make clear that small farms and access to locally produced food is not a sure thing.

For more viewing options and information about the production visit the film-maker's website.

Growing Local production poster
www.growinglocalfilms.org

Maine Public TV Air Time:
Sat., July 23 at 11:00 am

While "buying local" is on the rise, the stories in Growing Local make clear that small farms and access to locally produced food is not a sure thing.

In three short vignettes we meet the young farm couple Ben and Tayrn, who, on risky sweat-equity, have revitalized a famously fertile piece of farmland into a thriving community food hub; artisanal butcher Ben who helps us better understand how healthier, thoughtful meat production can be supported and sustained; and Richard and Adam, father and son organic dairy farmers struggling to keep their family farm going and in the family.

These poignant stories help us understand the interconnected fates of Maine's small farms, consumers and the local food movement.

The Lilac Ridge Farm family
www.pinterest.com

Maine Public TV Air Times:
Thur., June 23 at 10:30 pm
Sat., June 25 at 11:30 am

A film about sustainable agriculture and local food, centered on a family run farm in Brattleboro, Vermont.

Lilac Ridge: Life on a Family Farm was produced by Andy Reichsman and Kate Purdie of Ames Hill Film and Video.

Farm to Table in Maine Edit | Remove

  Chefs and policy experts talk about how the old concept of bringing fresh, local food directly to diners is now new again... and what makes Maine a farm-to-table hot spot. From tomatoes to tuna - buy it local and eat it fresh.

Host Jennifer Rooks was joined by 

Sam Hayward, Chef-partner of Fore Street Restaurant in Portland 

Buy Local

May 1, 2013

  Why buying local should mean more than going to your neighborhood farmer's market.

 Host Keith Shortall was joined by:

Kristen Smith, president of Portland Buy Local – and brand ambassador of Planet Dog

Garrett Martin, Executive Director, Maine Center for Economic Policy

Jason Bird, Business Development Officer/Downtown Coordinator, Staff Liaison,Downtown Bangor Partnership, City of Bangor

Family Farmers

May 1, 2012

  A discussion was held about what it takes to run a farm, the success rate for those new to the business, and why some are looking for a connection with the land and rural life.

Host Keith Shortall discussed family farming with:

Caragh Fitzgerald, Assistant Extension Professor, University of Maine Cooperative Extension,(she teaches a course to new farmers)

John Piotti, Executive Director, Maine Farmland Trust,

  Speaking in Maine features an address by Judy Wicks - co-founder and Chair of the Business Alliance for Local Living Economies. She speaks about the localization movement – businesses sustaining themselves by buying products and materials close to home.

Ms. Wicks' talk was recently recorded at the University of Maine at Presque Isle.

Visit the University of Maine at Presque Isle Web site