Maine Education Project

The Maine Education Project explores student-centered learning from early childhood through college and beyond. The project is funded by the Nellie Mae Education Foundation, which is working to encourage a transformation of public schools toward places that create learning opportunities to engage and inspire all students to meet challenging standards.

Spearheaded by Robbie Feinberg, education news producer, and Dave Boardman, education program coordinator, the project seeks stories about innovative learning in Maine’s classrooms and educational institutions and connects with the voices of students, educators and policymakers as they look at solutions to the challenges facing education today. We highlight the perspectives of students and educators, and provide curriculum resources for writing about education and finding success through our Raise Your Voice! initiative.

Have a story suggestion? Contact the team at MaineEducationProject@mainepublic.org.

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

Hundreds of students from across southern Maine left school early Friday afternoon and called for action on climate change on the steps of Portland's City Hall.

Gabor Degre / BDN - File

The outgoing chancellor of Maine's university system says the state is now on the "right path" for higher education, but still faces obstacles in the years ahead.

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

Since her time on the campaign trail, Gov. Janet Mills has been vocal about her desire to increase teacher salaries in Maine.

Susan Sharon / Maine Public

The Maine Department of Education has weighed in on the debate over the use of Native American mascots in schools.

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

School board members at RSU 21 in Kennebunk agreed Monday night to take steps towards launching an independent investigation into the district’s response to racist incidents at its schools in recent years.

According to recently released figures from the state Department of Education, many districts are expected to get a boost in state funding next year.

Keith Shortall / Maine Public file

Wednesday wasn't your average snow day for public school students in the Camden area.

Several Maine districts are leaving behind proficiency-based diplomas after the legislature ended a state mandate last year, according to the results of a new survey of superintendents.

A new study from the credit reporting agency Experian finds that student loan debt in Maine has nearly doubled since 2008.

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

Nearly two decades ago, Maine passed a law requiring that Native American history and culture be taught in the hundreds of elementary and high schools across the state. Today many schools are still a long way from fulfilling that goal, but a new initiative in Maine's largest city could help restore an educational focus on Wabanaki Studies.

Hannah Travis / Kennedy Library, Flickr, Creative Commons

A bill proposed by a state lawmaker from New Gloucester could limit the distribution of books and other materials in public schools that are judged to be “obscene.” The measure drew opposition Monday morning from a host of free-speech advocates, teachers and librarians, who say they worry that that it could have a “chilling effect” on what schools are allowed to teach.

The University of Maine System is examining more than 30 programs across its campuses for potential improvement or consolidation, though officials say they would be surprised if any face elimination this year.

After months of delays, the Maine Department of Education has finally released hundreds of thousands of dollars in grants to local districts to assist homeless students.

Jae C. Hong / AP Photo

More than 10 percent of students in Maine Public Schools have "chronic health conditions," such as asthma, type-1 diabetes and seizure disorders. Some local school officials say they believe the numbers of students with serious health needs is growing. This can lead to a particularly difficult problem in small, rural school districts, which may not have a full-time school nurse.

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public File

According to the latest report from the U.S. Department of Education, Maine schools are in need of teachers in all kinds of subjects, from math and science to Spanish and special education. The state Department of Education has proposed loosening some of its certification requirements, which some school officials hope can address the shortage.

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