Maine

Maine news

Eastport Arts Center

The COVID-19 crisis continues to wreak havoc on the performing arts throughout Maine. We’ll learn how artists and venues have found creative ways to continue to reach audiences, and hear about plans for 2021. We’ll also discuss what long-term effects the pandemic will have on arts and culture in Maine.

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

For students with disabilities, it’s important that needed services be provided as early as possible. But schools and state officials acknowledge that low wages and teacher shortages have left many families waiting for those services, with the pandemic only making the problem worse.

Maine Public

  

Dr. Nirav Shah returns to answer questions about the continuing surge in COVID-19 cases, the start of vaccine distribution in Maine, and what to expect with the state's response to the pandemic in the new year.

The number of bicycle fatalities in Maine remained the same as in 2019, with two bicyclists killed in car crashes.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/pennstatelive/

This show is only airing at 7 pm—it's a rebroadcast of an earlier show (original air date October 29, 2020); no calls will be taken.  

Of the many side effects that COVID-19 has had on people's wellbeing, sleep often comes up in conversation as something that has been disrupted during the pandemic. We will talk with medical experts about how sleep is integrated with overall mental and physical health, what ways the pandemic is affecting people's sleep (and even their dreams), and approaches that can help foster healthy sleep patterns.


binkley27 / Flickr/Creative Commons

LifeFlight helicopters and planes bring patients to the critical care they need when ground services like ambulances aren’t fast enough or can’t reach remote spaces.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/21546823@N02/

This is a rebroadcast of an earlier show (original air date November 25, 2020); no calls will be taken.

What's the best advice you've ever gotten? Or given? We pose these questions to well-known figures around Maine, as well as to anyone who wants to weigh in, and gain some wisdom about how to approach life.


Maine State Police via AP

Traffic fatalities increased during 2020, with 165 people dying in Maine vehicle crashes so far, eight more than in all of 2019.

Maine Memory Network

This is a rebroadcast of an earlier show (original air date November 30, 2020); no calls will be taken.

The four Wabanaki tribes in Maine—Micmac, Maliseet, Penobscot and Passamaquoddy—have been here since long before Europeans arrived and Maine became a state.

We will discuss tribal history in Maine, and learn about the significant challenges and advances among Native Americans in Maine over the years. This is part of our ongoing series of bicentennial shows about Maine's history.

Travel to and from Maine remained depressed over Christmas weekend.

In a news item that was heard in newscasts at 3 p.m., 4:30 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. Monday, Dec. 28, 2020, Maine Public incorrectly reported that 130,000 Mainers have been vaccinated against COVID-19. Only 17,000 Mainers have received their vaccinations; 130,000 refers to the size of the 1A group — the highest-priority tier for vaccination.

https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/infographic/ripple-effects-atlantic-salmon-conservation

This is a rebroadcast of an earlier show (original air date December 8, 2020); no calls will be taken.

The removal of the Edwards Dam from the Kennebec River — and the Great Works and Veazie Dams from the Penobscot — made national news and ushered in a new era for Maine's sea run fish. But the work is far from over. We'll discuss projects to remove dams, create fish passages and reconstruct culverts all over the state, and what these projects mean for the health of our rivers and streams. This program ties in with the publication of a new book this month about the Penobscot River restoration project.


Bangor Daily News

This show is part of our coverage of topics relating to Maine's bicentennial. It is a rebroadcast of an earlier show (original air date November 2, 2020); no calls will be taken.

One of the most renowned leaders to hail from Maine, Margaret Chase Smith was the first woman to win election to both the U.S. House and U.S. Senate. She made her mark with her independent stances, including legislation on behalf of women in the armed services, and her famous "Declaration of Conscience" speech, criticizing Sen. Joseph McCarthy's red-baiting tactics. We discuss her remarkable life and career, and the relevance of her actions to today's political climate.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/prachatai/

Our panel of editorial page editors returns for a look back at the year that was, if nothing else, historic. We’ll discuss the pandemic, the racial justice movement, the 2020 campaigns—and what to look forward to in the new year.


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