NASA

https://www.nancyatkinson.com/blog/eight-years-to-the-moon/

July 20, 2019, marks the 50th anniversary of the moon landing. Join us as we learn about the tremendous undertaking that were the Apollo missions, and hear listener memories of one of the most momentous days in human history.


https://www.nasa.gov/astronauts/biographies/jessica-u-meir/biography

NASA recently announced that astronaut Jessica Meir will take her first space flight this fall.  She takes a moment away from her busy training to talk about her upcoming mission to the International Space Station and to share an inside look at the life of an astronaut.

https://images.nasa.gov/

Please note: Today's show will repeat at 9 pm, rather than the usual 8 pm rebroadcast.

This month marks the 60th anniversary of the creation of NASA. Our panelists discuss what may be next for NASA, and the latest news from out of this world, including the search for Planet X, the aborted mission to the International Space Station, and the Hubble and Chandra glitches.

Space News

Feb 20, 2018
http://www.spacex.com/news

The latest news from out of this world.  We’ll preview the NASA launch schedule for 2018 and discuss the role commercial space flight might play in satellite launches and human exploration of space. 

Guests:  Dr. Julie Ziffer, Physics Professor at the University of Southern Maine.  She was part of an international research team that was the first to discover water-ice on an asteroid surface.  The International Astronomical Union recognized her contributions to planetary science by naming asteroid 7909 Ziffer in her honor.

 

Shawn Laatsch, Director of the Emera Astronomy Center & Jordan Planetarium at the University of Maine. He's also the president of the International Planetarium Society, Inc.

 

Jason Crusan, Division Director for NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems.


Mars

Oct 7, 2015
https://www.flickr.com/photos/inorman/

What's next for Mars and NASA now that water has been discovered on the red planet?

Lauren Harnett / Courtesy NASA

NASA may have stopped running space shuttles, but that doesn't mean it's not busy out there. There are six astronauts at the International Space Station, and in the world of unmanned exploration, the Curiosity Rover has been sending pictures back from Mars for three years, and those photos have 2 million followers on Twitter.