Portland Waterfront

Robert F. Bukaty / Associated Press

Portland's City Council is looking at new development restrictions to the city's commercial waterfront in response to fishermen's fears that they are being crowded out by the city's rapid development.

Fred Bever / Maine Public

Portland-based fishermen and their allies are ramping up their protest against a waterfront development that they say is crowding them out.

Fred Bever / Maine Public

Anxiety is growing in Portland’s lobstering community over the city's increasingly crowded waterfront. A traffic study that is in the works is calling the situation an "existential threat" to the city's marine industries, and lobstermen seem to agree.

Willis Spear fishes 800 traps from a Commercial Street wharf that also houses two restaurants, the Harbor fish market, and a major bait fish dealer. He says city officials are approving new developments too quickly, adding more and more cars to the downtown mix.

David Harry / The Forecaster

The Maine Narrow Gauge Railroad says it will have a new place to run its trains. Thursday's Portland Daily Sun reports Central Maine Power is ready to donate a two-mile strip of land in Gray that the railroad could use to lay track. The paper also says there would be enough room at Gray Plaza for the museum to put up a building larger than its existing exhibit space on the Portland waterfront. The railroad has operated along a former rail bed that runs along the base of Portland's Eastern Promenade and along the waterfront to the city's Ocean Gateway cruise ship terminal.