racism

Twenty-two corporate and civic sponsors have seeded a new fund designed to tackle systemic racism in Maine.

Willis Ryder Arnold / Maine Public

In the wake of protests over racial injustice, many are left wondering: What's next? We'll discuss what ways people can continue to engage with the ongoing fight against systemic racism, and what actions lead to more meaningful outcomes in the long run.


Maine Public File

While Maine lawmakers set the agenda for a state commission on race Wednesday, nearly 150 Portland area municipal leaders joined the first in a series of seminars on how local government can take action on racial equity as well.

The seminars are sponsored by the Greater Portland Council of Governments and led by Tori Pelletier, a Black woman who grew up in Maine. She bore witness to the daily challenges — and all-too-frequent racist abuse — she faces in this state.

Calling it a pervasive blight on our constitutional republic and the world at large, the Maine Supreme Judicial Court has issued a statement decrying racism and other forms of bias.

https://art.poorpeoplescampaign.org/

This show is a rebroadcast of an earlier show (original air date October 10, 2019); no calls will be taken.

The Poor People’s Campaign, a movement originally organized by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., in 1968, comes to Maine on Oct. 10, as part of a 20-state tour. The Poor People’s Campaign aims to change the national conversation and seriously address systemic racism, poverty, the war economy and ecological devastation.


https://art.poorpeoplescampaign.org/

The Poor People’s Campaign, a movement originally organized by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., in 1968, comes to Maine on Oct. 10, as part of a 20-state tour. The Poor People’s Campaign aims to change the national conversation and seriously address systemic racism, poverty, the war economy and ecological devastation.


Office of Gov. Janet Mills

Over the past week, Gov. Janet Mills has signed into law dozens of bills passed by the Maine lawmakers this session. For the two African American members of the Legislature, a pair of bills in particular stand out.

Susan Sharon / Maine Public

Hate-related behavior, racism and prejudice are all too prevalent in our world, as we saw in the New Zealand shootings. We look at what the climate is like in Maine, and what can be done to address hate, prejudice and discrimination in our state.


https://www.facebook.com/surjsm/photos/gm.517709191916698/788728597965655/?type=3&theater

Shay Stewart Bouley and Debby Irving join us to talk about race, racism and their "Cross-Racial Conversations" workshops.

Guests:  Shay Stewart-Bouley, is the executive director of Community Change Inc., the oldest continuously running anti-racist organization in the United States.  Most probably know her from her blog "Black Girl in Maine," where she writes about life in Maine as a woman of color, growing into middle age and musing on the state of race relations in the United States, among occasional other topics.

Debby Irving is a racial justice educator, author of Waking Up White, and public speaker

Maine Public TV Air Times:
Thur., Feb. 8 at 10:00 pm
Sat., Feb. 10 at 11:00 am

Shadows Fall North delves deep into the overlooked history of racism in Northern New England — to set the record straight and most importantly, to rally us to recognize that Black history is New Hampshire history and American history.

Racism Today

Aug 24, 2016
https://www.flickr.com/photos/pug50/

How do we define racism today? On one hand we have a new surge of exclusionary attitudes and racial conflicts, while we also have increased awareness and extreme sensitivity over racial issues. We'll look at the history of racism, andhow it is playing out in today's society -- especially here in Maine.

Guests:

Prof. Brian Purnell, Associate Professor, Africana Studies and History, Bowdoin College

Dr. Kenneth Lewis, pastor of Green Memorial AME Zion Church

Irwin Gratz / MPBN

PORTLAND, Maine - Portland leaders gathered in front of City Hall today to denounce those who have been responsible for several racially-charged incidents in recent weeks. Portland Councilor John Hinck said the problem is not easy to solve.

"If we, as elected officials, could pass a resolution, adopt an ordinance, set penalties that eliminated racism, hatred, bigotry, intimidation forever, we would do it," he said. "It's not that simple."