RGGI

RGGI Moves Forward as New Hampshire Debates Participation

Dec 26, 2017

The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, or RGGI, has cut carbon emissions in New England and neighboring states to about half what they were in 2005. The program has a new, more aggressive goal for the next decade while New Hampshire lawmakers debate whether to stay or go.

FILE- In this Oct. 26, 2011 file photo, wind turbines line the hillside at First Wind's project in Sheffield, Vt.
Toby Talbot / AP Photo/File

Nine states in the region, including Maine, say they will set more aggressive limits on pollution by electricity generation plants.

The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, or RGGI, is a market-based cap-and-trade program that sets limits on carbon-dioxide emissions in participating states. Power generators can buy and sell emission allowances under the program, and it produces revenues that the states largely invest in energy efficiency.

FILE - In this Oct. 21, 2013 photograph, CO2 filed pipes are secured by a barbed wire topped fence at the Kemper County energy facility near DeKalb, Miss.
AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis

While the federal government pulls back from global efforts to reduce greenhouse gas pollution, the New England states are considering more aggressive curbs on power plant carbon emissions.

The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, or RGGI, is a market-based cap-and-trade program that sets limits on carbon-dioxide emissions in nine states, including all of New England. Power generators can buy and sell emission allowances under the program — which can give a financial boost to cleaner sources such as wind or hydro plants. So far RGGI’s allowance auctions have raised more than $2.5 billion, with the proceeds flowing to the states, and most of them investing heavily in energy efficiency efforts.

AUGUSTA, Maine — Maine businesses would receive a 40% increase in funding for their participation in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, a cap and trade program known as RGGI under a bill advanced by the governor's office. But opponents say changing the RGGI distribution formula would actually result in increased business energy costs.

WASHINGTON - For the first time ever, power plants must limit carbon emissions under a Clean Power Plan released today by the Obama administration. The plan sets a target of reducing carbon emissions by 30 percent below 2005 levels by 2030.

Environment and health advocates across the state are calling the plan the single most important action the U.S. has taken to reduce carbon emissions. But there are concerns that Congress might may try to undermine the plan.

AUGUSTA, Maine - A new report finds that the nation's first market-based program to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide from new and existing power plants is achieving success by every measure possible.

Patty Wight / MPBN

WESTBROOK, Maine -- Environmental advocates gathered in Westbrook this morning to celebrate what they say is the success of a multi-state regional "cap-and-trade" program that seeks to reduce carbon dioxide pollution by placing limits on emissions from fossil fuel-burning power plants.

The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, or RGGI, is slated to hold its 25th carbon credit auction today.  

Getting Down to Business on Climate Action panel discussion
Natural Resources Council of Maine

  The Natural Resources Council of Maine and the Portland Regional Chamber hosted a panel discussion about climate change focusing on how the regional climate initiative (RGGI) has impacted Maine businesses. Also discussed was the brand-new U.S. EPA carbon pollution standards that ask the rest of the country’s power plants to adopt the standards adhered to by Maine. The panel consisted of Senator Angus King (I-Maine); U.S.

New Carbon Rules: Is New England Already Complying?

May 20, 2014
iStock Photo/Thinkstock

Coal-burning power plants are bracing for new carbon regulations due out in June. In the Midwest where there are states that get as much as 70 percent of their electricity from coal, many are worried that these new regulations will cost jobs.  But New England may already be compliant with the rules before they are even written.