Sen. Susan Collins

J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

PORTLAND, Maine - Republican U.S. Sen. Susan Collins is calling media coverage of her support for a tax overhaul "unbelievably sexist."

Susan Walsh / Associated Press

Speaking Sunday on the CBS's Face The Nation, Maine Republican Sen. Susan Collins discussed the GOP tax bill, saying Republican leaders have assured her that changes she is seeking will be included in the bill as a committee hammers out a final version. 

She said she has no reason not to believe those promises. One of them is that Medicare won't be slashed to pay for the $1.4 trillion tax cut.

J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

PORTLAND, Maine - Republican U.S. Sen. Susan Collins of Maine says she may change her vote on the GOP tax overhaul if her amendments are not included in the final version.
 
She tells WABI-TV that she won't make a final decision until she sees what comes out of a conference committee.  
 
Collins joined the majority in a 51-49 vote after her amendments on property tax and medical expense deductions were included. She also says she secured a promise from House and Senate leaders to remove the threat of a 4 percent cut to Medicare.
 

WASHINGTON - The bipartisan group No Labels is getting a boost from Republican Sen. Susan Collins of Maine and Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia.
 
The senators were selected honorary co-chairs of the group this week.
 
Former Sen. Joe Lieberman of Connecticut, who's a national co-chairman, says the goal of No Labels is to counter "rising political extremism with an aggressive bipartisan push to solve problems.''
 

Robert F. Bukaty / Associated Press/file

Maine Republican U.S. Sen. Susan Collins is taking to the airwaves to criticize President Trump on a variety of issues, from health care to presidential decorum.

On MSNBC's "Morning Joe" program Monday, Collins took issue with Trump's "Twitter war" with Sen. Bob Corker, saying it isn't "productive."

Brian Bechard / Maine Public

ROCKPORT, Maine — The pull of legacy and a chance to take the reins of state government were not enough to convince Republican U.S. Sen. Susan Collins to run for governor.

Robert F. Bukaty / Associated Press

ROCKPORT, Maine - Republican Sen. Susan Collins is set to announce whether she will stay in the U.S. Senate or run for governor of her home state of Maine.
 
The 64-year-old Collins plans to announce her decision on Friday at an event in Rockport.
 
The moderate Republican was first elected in 1996 and has played a pivotal role in the Senate in recent debates about health care policy.
 

Robert F. Bukaty / Associated Press

PORTLAND, Maine - Sen. Susan Collins' office says she'll make an announcement on Friday about whether she'll run for governor of Maine.
 
The moderate Republican was first elected in 1996 and has played a pivotal role in the Senate in recent debates about health care policy. She said previously that she would decide during the Senate's weeklong Columbus Day recess whether to stay in Washington or run for governor.
 
Collins' office did not say where the senator would make the much-anticipated announcement.
 

The question of whether Republican Sen. Susan Collins is going to stay in Washington or return to Maine to run for governor will soon be answered.

Vice President Mike Pence spoke to radio station WGAN in Portland this morning about Republican U.S. Sen. Susan Collins’ decision to vote against the latest GOP attempt to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

“We’re certainly disappointed that Sen. Collins has chosen to vote against the Graham-Cassidy bill,” he said. “We think this is the best opportunity that we’ve had to give the people of Maine, the people of America, a fresh start on the failing policies of Obamacare.”

Alex Brandon / Associated Press

Maine U.S. Sen. Susan Collins said Thursday that she has many reservations about the Cassidy-Graham bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, but she hasn't yet decided whether to support or reject the legislation.

Collins said first she wants to see the Congressional Budget Office's analysis, due out early next week. “I‘ve been reluctant to take a final position on this bill because I have been given numbers that are widely divergent,” Collins said Thursday morning, at an event in Augusta.

Steve Mistler / Maine Public

Maine Republican U.S. Sen. Susan Collins outlined the two factors she's weighing before making a decision about a run for a governor during a question-and-answer session at York County Community College Friday.

President Donald Trump speaks at a rally at the Phoenix Convention Center, Tuesday, Aug. 22, 2017, in Phoenix.
Rick Scuteri / AP Photo

At his campaign rally in Phoenix, President Donald Trump vowed to block passage of the federal budget for the next year if Congress fails to pay for his proposed wall to keep illegal immigrants out of the country. Members of Maine’s Congressional delegation say they’re concerned by those comments.

Trump was playing to a supportive crowd when he made his threat against a federal budget that Congress has been working on for months.

BANGOR, Maine - Republican Sen. Susan Collins of Maine didn't vote for President Donald Trump and she says she's not sure if he'll be the GOP nominee in 2020.

She tells MSNBC that there's "a long ways between now and that point.''

Collins wrote in House Speaker Paul Ryan's name in November instead of voting for any of the presidential candidates on the ballot. She said, "That was very hard for me to do as a lifelong Republican.''

Both of Maine’s senators were on MSNBC today and were asked about President Trump’s on going response to the violence in Charlottesville.

Senator Angus King said the President must come to understand that his words become policy, and he must choose them more carefully.

“You can’t do that when your President, you are setting the moral tone for the country, you can move markets, you can start a war,” says King. “I mean you have to be really careful about every word you say and I don’t think he gets that.”

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