SNAP benefits

Jennifer Mitchell/Maine Public

Poverty relief organizations in Maine say they are relieved that the 2018 US Farm Bill has passed with the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, intact.

Democrats and Republicans in the U.S. House are expected to vote Thursday or Friday on the merits of this year's farm bill. The bill makes numerous changes to ongoing programs, including strengthening work requirements for people who receive benefits under the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as food stamps.

Republican Second District Representative Bruce Poliquin says the bill will also offer some exemptions for Maine families who currently receive those SNAP benefits.

The latest skirmish between Gov. LePage and the federal government over food stamps has taken another turn. The feds now say that more than 195,000 Mainers who receive food assistance could lose it if Gov. Paul LePage follows through on his threat to stop administering the program. There is no backup if the state bows out.

AUGUSTA, Maine — Maine has filed for a waiver from the federal government to prevent the use of food stamp funds to pay for the purchase of sugary soda or candy.

WASHINGTON - Sometimes you have to wonder about the bill titles they think up in Washington:  How about the VARIETY Act?  That’s the "Vegetables Are Really Important Eating Tools For You Act."  But there is an interesting policy proposal behind the awkward title.

What’s behind the bill is the attempt to convince those on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program - known as SNAP for short, and otherwise known as food stamps - to eat more healthy foods.  It offers an incentive to do that by giving recipients more benefits each month.

AUGUSTA, Maine - Advocates for the low-income, veterans and the homeless turned out in Augusta to express their strong opposition to a proposal from the Department of Health and Human Services to cut off food stamps or SNAP benefits to able-bodied, childless adults after three months unless they work 20 hours a week, volunteer or undergo job training. Advocates say the proposal establishes an "unrealistic and unachievable" expectation that will overwhelm food pantries and soup kitchens and create hardships for people, especially young veterans.