Wabanaki

barharbormaine.gov

The Abbe Museum in Bar Harbor is receiving almost $170,000 in federal grant money to support its efforts to 'decolonize' exhibits — and to help other institutions do the same.

Jennifer Mitchell / Maine Public

Before Europeans settled on the East Coast, the Wabanaki tribes had open access to all of Maine's natural resources, from eels to ash, and sweetgrass to salmon. 

https://www.abbemuseum.org/exhibits-archive/

The inaugural Abbe Museum Indian Market takes place in Bar Harbor May 18-20. The market will support Wabanaki artists and the local community. We’ll discuss the art of the Wabanaki, its effect on the local economy and learn about events taking place to celebrate the inaugural event.

Racism Today

Aug 24, 2016
https://www.flickr.com/photos/pug50/

How do we define racism today? On one hand we have a new surge of exclusionary attitudes and racial conflicts, while we also have increased awareness and extreme sensitivity over racial issues. We'll look at the history of racism, andhow it is playing out in today's society -- especially here in Maine.

Guests:

Prof. Brian Purnell, Associate Professor, Africana Studies and History, Bowdoin College

Dr. Kenneth Lewis, pastor of Green Memorial AME Zion Church

A still frame from First Light
vimeo.com

Maine Public TV Air Time:
Sat., Oct. 15 at 11:00 am

The Maine Wabanaki-State Child Welfare Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) is the nation's first task force dedicated to uncovering and acknowledging the truth about what happened to Wabanaki children and families involved with the Maine child welfare system.

Maine Arts Commission

A  25 year old Passamaquoddy man is in South Africa this week to take part in a gathering of young leaders.