public schools

Many school districts have pushed back the date on which they hope students can return to their classrooms. 

A new bill would restore state funding for school administrators that could be cut in some districts as part of last year's budget agreement. Maine school leaders want to restore state funding for administrators that could be cut for some districts as part of last year's budget agreement.

Under last year's agreement, districts that do not join "regional service centers" could lose nearly $100 per student from the state in coming years. On Wednesday, lawmakers heard from school officials who supported getting rid of those potential cuts.

A student at Mt. Blue High School in Farmington makes smoothies in Home Ec. class
Jennifer Mitchell/Maine Public

Depending on your age, you may remember a school course called Home Economics. Or perhaps you knew it as Family and Consumer Science or “FCS.”

Or maybe you don’t know it at all; the subject that once taught young people how to live is rapidly disappearing from Maine schools.

The latest round of school report cards, released today by the Maine Department of Education, show a majority of schools still struggling to meet the LePage administration's standards for improvement. More than 150 Maine schools received lower grades from the state this year versus last, while nearly 100 schools boosted their scores at least one letter grade.

Overall this year, there were fewer As and Bs and more Ds and Fs, while the majority of schools got a C.

When last year's grades came out, educators across the state railed at Gov. Paul LePage. The governor, they complained, was labeling schools as failing - without offering enough context on the challenges, socio-economic and otherwise, that can get in the way of learning and contribute to low test scores.