Robbie Feinberg

News Producer

Robbie grew up in New Hampshire, but has since written stories for radio stations from Washington, DC, to a fishing village in Alaska. Robbie graduated from the University of Maryland and got his start in public radio at the Transom Story Workshop in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. Before arriving at Maine Public Radio, he worked in the Midwest, where he covered everything from beer to migrant labor for public radio station WMUK in Kalamazoo, Michigan.

Ways to Connect

University of Maine

The University of Maine received authorization Monday to remove the name of a former president - and leading advocate for eugenics - from a lecture hall on campus.

Robert F. Bukaty / Associated Press

The Mills administration is providing local schools with an additional $164 million to help them implement new health and safety procedures during the pandemic.

Portland city councilors voted Monday night to cut more than 60 city positions in its budget, as part of an effort to address a steep drop-off in revenue because of the pandemic.

@baxteracademy / Twitter

So far, many schools in Maine say they’ve been pleased as they’ve welcomed students back into the classroom this fall. But COVID-19 risks still exist in and outside of school: in just the past week, positive cases prompted schools in Harpswell, Sanford and Dixfield to close their doors for at least a few weeks.

Robert F. Bukaty / AP Images

Opponents of a 145-mile proposed transmission line through Western Maine are launching a second effort to let voters have a say on the project.

Bangor Daily News

The Penobscot Nation is calling on the city of Bangor to take down a monument honoring a Portuguese explorer from the city's waterfront.

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public File

Two more school systems in Maine are temporarily moving to remote classes because of COVID-19.

Robbie Feinberg / Maine Public

Many young people in Maine have large gaps in their basic knowledge of the Holocaust, and more than half say they've recently seen Nazi symbols online or in their communities.

sjcme.edu

This weekend, St. Joseph’s College President Jim Dlugos wrote a letter to the campus community saying that the school had detected nine cases of COVID-19 — most from a single residence hall — and would move to remote classes for the next two weeks.

Wikimedia commons

Schools and coaches in York County are facing new challenges as they attempt to adapt to fall sports guidelines that will prohibit practices and games in the region for at least two weeks.

Courtesy photo / via Facebook

The state is still advising that schools in York County should add extra precautions and reconsider full, in-person classes this fall.

Rebecca Conley / Maine Public

Like many Maine parents, Amanda Hutter was left without a safety net when schools closed and switched to remote learning this spring. Her son is autistic and has behavioral challenges. Without access to special needs child care, Hutter was forced to leave her job in order to support him.

Linda Coan O'Kresik / Bangor Daily News

The Maine Principals' Association and state officials have agreed on a plan that would allow several interscholastic sports to be played this fall but would push football and volleyball to the spring. The new guidelines were announced Thursday. But more details need be worked out before any games begin.

Pixabay stock image

The Maine Principals' Association and state officials have agreed on a plan that would allow several interscholastic sports to be played this fall, but would push football and volleyball to the spring. The groups announced the new guidelines Thursday.

TED S. WARREN / AP Images

One of the biggest changes that students are facing as schools reopen this fall are new "hybrid" schedules, in which they may go to class just two or three days per week. That is also challenging for many parents who are now scrambling to find child care in a state where access and cost were major barriers, even before the pandemic.

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