John Dillon

A veteran Vermont reporter, John joined VPR in 2001. Previously, John was a staff writer for the Sunday Times Argus and the Sunday Rutland Herald, responsible for breaking stories and in-depth features on local issues. He has also served as Communications Director for the Vermont Health Care Authority and Bureau Chief for UPI in Montpelier.
 
John was honored with two regional Edward R. Murrow Awards in 2007 for his reporting on VPR. He was the lead reporter for a VPR series on climate change that in 2008 won a national Edward R. Murrow award for continuing coverage. In 2009, John's coverage of an asbestos mine in northern Vermont was recognized with a regional investigative reporting award from the Radio-Television News Directors Association.

 

The region's largest dairy cooperative will impose a new pricing system in January in an effort to curb excess milk production.

An advocacy group for Vermont migrant farmworkers is pressuring the Hannaford supermarket chain to join a program designed to get more money to dairy workers.

A recent case shows that when undocumented immigrants encounter local law enforcement, they may still run the risk of being turned over to federal immigration authorities. This happened despite a fair and impartial policing policy that discourages authorities from doing so.

While the U.S. dairy industry has welcomed the new trade deal with Canada and Mexico, Canadian farmers say it will further erode a support system that has kept markets strong and many dairy producers profitable.  

Dairy farmers in the Northeast say they're ready to talk about something that's been almost off limits for decades: how to manage the milk supply to stop overproduction.

An international border divides Lake Memphremagog in Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom. And for the last seven summers, a group of marathon swimmers have challenged that border and themselves.

A Nature Conservancy project in northern Vermont will store carbon to meet California’s greenhouse gas reduction goals. The group says proceeds from the sale of these “carbon credits” will pay for future land protection projects.

Why would anyone want to buy a closed nuclear power plant, along with its long legacy of radioactive waste?

Maple syrup producers take pride in their pure, natural product. So when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration proposed new labels to say maple syrup contains “added sugar,” producers fought back.

In yet another sign of the chronic milk glut that’s forced down prices paid to farmers, the federal government has allowed Northeast dairy co-ops to dump milk if they can’t find a market.

Lawmakers in Vermont have approved legalizing recreational marijuana, and the bill soon goes to the state’s Republican governor, who says he will sign it.

The bill soon goes to the state’s Republican governor, who says he will sign it.

The bill allows possession of up to an ounce of marijuana, or two mature plants. It does not allow a regulated retail market, such as California’s or Colorado’s.

Times are bright for solar energy in New England. From small projects to massive, multi-acre arrays, solar projects are both changing the landscape and transforming the way we buy, sell and transmit electricity. 

Yet the solar boom poses unique challenges for the regional grid, as well as for one small, member-owned utility in northern Vermont.