Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Shuran Huang / NPR

Our panel discusses the legacy of the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and looks ahead to the looming battle over her potential successor. What does the future hold for the Supreme Court?


Ed Morin / Maine Public

Several hundred people gathered Sunday evening in Portland's Monument Square for a vigil honoring late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

Doug Mills / AP Images

Flags are flying at half-staff in Maine and around the country to honor Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died Friday evening at age 87 due to complications from pancreatic cancer.

Updated at 11:10 a.m. ET

With her 14-month-old daughter on her hip, Anna Lashley, an attorney from Washington, D.C., came to pay her last respects to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the Supreme Court on Saturday.

"I just can't wait to tell my daughter about her, and teach her about the lessons she taught me, and what she did for women," Lashley said.

Maine Republican Sen. Susan Collins says the nomination of a Supreme Court justice to fill the vacancy left by the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg should be made by whichever candidate wins the presidential election.

When President Trump learned Friday night that Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg had died, he told reporters she was an "amazing woman." Later, in an official statement, he called her a "titan of the law." And while Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., wrote in a statement that he would bring a vote for a new justice to the floor, Trump did not weigh in.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP Images

Friday's passing of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, an icon for gender equality supporters, is quickly rippling through a hotly contested Maine U.S. Senate race already shaped by judicial appointments.

Republican U.S. Sen. Susan Collins of Maine is calling the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg "one of the most prominent legal luminaries of our time." But she isn't addressing whether the nomination for her successor should happen now, or after the election.

The death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg is a major cultural moment and has potential implications for the next generation of American society.

Just look at the images of people who crowded the Supreme Court's steps Friday night after news of her death broke.

Follow NPR's coverage of Ginsburg's death and the political aftermath here.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the demure firebrand who in her 80s became a legal, cultural and feminist icon, died Friday. The Supreme Court announced her death, saying the cause was complications from metastatic cancer of the pancreas.

The court, in a statement, said Ginsburg died at her home in Washington, D.C., surrounded by family. She was 87.