Steve Mistler

Chief Political Correspondent and State House Bureau Chief

Steve has been a journalist for nearly two decades, specializing in the coverage of politics and state government. His work has been recognized by the Maine Press Association and the New England Newspaper and Press Association for investigative projects and accountability journalism. He was named the MPA’s Journalist of the Year in 2011 for his coverage of municipal government for The Forecaster in Falmouth and, later, for his coverage of state government for the Sun Journal in Lewiston.

Steve became the state house bureau chief for the Portland Press Herald/Maine Sunday Telegram in 2012. After four years with Maine’s largest daily newspaper, Steve made the leap to radio journalism, joining Maine Public in May 2016.

Steve is married with one child and has two crazy dogs. His family lives in Brunswick.

Ways to Connect

Robert F. Bukaty / Associated Press

The coronavirus pandemic featured prominently in last night's Maine U.S. Senate debate, as Democratic candidate Sara Gideon and Republican Sen. Susan Collins sparred over state and federal relief efforts.

Maine’s 2nd Congressional District received a lot of national attention four years ago. It’s about to get some more.

Susan Walsh / Associated Press file

Republican Sen. Susan Collins made it clear on Tuesday that she will vote against a Supreme Court nominee if a Senate vote occurs before the November election.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP Images

Friday's passing of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, an icon for gender equality supporters, is quickly rippling through a hotly contested Maine U.S. Senate race already shaped by judicial appointments.

With so much attention on the presidential race and the battle for Congress it’s easy to forget that control of the Maine Legislature is also at stake in November.

Maine Public Illustration / Photos by Mark Vogelzang/Maine Public and J. Scott Applewhite/Associated Press

With less than two months left before Election Day, the U.S. Senate race in Maine is already the most expensive in state history. And that’s prompted the four candidates to decry the influence of money in politics while also blaming one another for its impact on one of the most closely watched contests in the country.

AP Images

Republican U.S. Sen. Susan Collins and Democratic challenger Sara Gideon exchanged barbs Friday over health care, judicial appointments and President Donald Trump in the first debate of a race that could determine which party controls the U.S. Senate next year.

Rebecca Conley / Maine Public

The first debate of the Maine U.S. Senate race is over. And somehow a race that kicked off more than a year ago has finally just begun.

With 60 days remaining until the election, this week’s Pulse begins with an important public service announcement.

Courtesy Maine House of Representatives

An Aroostook County man has filed a complaint against assistant Maine House Minority Leader Trey Stewart of Presque Isle, alleging that the Republican legislator violated campaign finance law by using a political action committee to reimburse himself for clothes and new tires.

Click here to subscribe to Maine's Political Pulse Newsletter, sent to your inbox on Friday mornings.

The pandemic edition of the Republican National Convention is in the books, but before it even began the GOP was confronted with an important question: What does the modern Republican party stand for?

Steve Mistler / Maine Public

Maine U.S. Senate candidate Sara Gideon outlined her six-part health care agenda on Tuesday, which the Democrat hopes will give her an edge in her bid to unseat Republican Sen. Susan Collins.

This is the inaugural issue of Maine's Political Pulse Newsletter, a weekly update on Maine and national politics in the leadup to the November election. Click here to subscribe, and you'll receive an edition each Friday morning.

Willis Ryder Arnold / Maine Public

Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Sara Gideon on Tuesday joined in the growing criticism of U.S. Postmaster General Louis DeJoy for implementing changes blamed for widespread delays in mail delivery.

Robert F. Bukaty / AP Images

In a devastating blow to opponents of Central Maine Power's controversial powerline proposal, the Maine Supreme Judicial Court ruled Thursday that a ballot initiative designed to scuttle the $1 billion project is unconstitutional. The ruling all but ensures that the referendum will not appear on the November ballot, leaving the project's many detractors to continue the fight on the permitting and legislative front.

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