New England Clean Energy Connect

Robert F. Bukaty / Associated Press

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has awarded Central Maine Power a permit for the controversial transmission line the company wants to build through Maine’s western woods.

The 145-mile line would carry hydro-electricity from Canadian dams through western Maine and into the regional power grid, to serve a contract with Massachusetts utilities. The corps permit requires mitigation for wetland and other ecological impacts, and it is one of the last approvals the project needs.

Robert F. Bukaty / AP Images

A new effort to give state voters a say over Central Maine Power’s proposed transmission line through Maine’s western woods is now formally launched.

Robert F. Bukaty / Associated Press file

Three environmental groups are suing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for failing to require a full-blown Environmental Impact Statement for Central Maine Power’s proposed transmission line through the state’s western woods.

Central Maine Power’s controversial proposal for a transmission line through western Maine continues to draw attention from regulators and opponents. On Tuesday morning, the Maine Public Utilities Commission gave its final approval for a spinoff company to own and operate the project.

AUGUSTA, Maine - Maine's secretary of state won't be putting a referendum targeting a 145-mile  hydropower transmission corridor on the November ballot.

Robert F. Bukaty / AP Images

In a devastating blow to opponents of Central Maine Power's controversial powerline proposal, the Maine Supreme Judicial Court ruled Thursday that a ballot initiative designed to scuttle the $1 billion project is unconstitutional. The ruling all but ensures that the referendum will not appear on the November ballot, leaving the project's many detractors to continue the fight on the permitting and legislative front.

NO TO NECEC FACEBOOK

Update 12:40 p.m. August 13, 2020: Maine court rules that the peoples' veto effort on CMP transmission line is unconstitutional

Maine’s highest court heard oral arguments Wednesday on whether voters should get a chance to force state regulators to revoke their approval of Central Maine Power's controversial powerline project.

PORTLAND, Maine - Maine's highest court is scheduled to hear arguments about the future of a citizens' campaign to block a much-debated hydropower project.

Robert F. Bukaty / AP Images

About two dozen current and former Maine legislators are calling on Hydro-Quebec to stop its campaign to influence November's ballot referendum on a proposed transmission line through the state.

"SAY NO TO 145-MILE CMP TRANSMISSION LINE THROUGH MAINE" VIA FACEBOOK

The Penobscot Nation is coming out in opposition to Central Maine Power’s proposed transmission line through Maine’s western woods.

Robert F. Bukaty / AP Images

Canadian energy giant Hydro-Quebec says it will offer Maine a cut-rate deal on a slice of the electricity carried by a powerline that Central Maine Power wants to build through Maine's western woods. The rest of that supply is contracted to serve customers in Massachusetts.

Robert F. Bukaty / AP File

The state’s Bureau of Parks and Lands has signed a revised deal with Central Maine Power to lease a public parcel for the utility’s controversial power line through western Maine. It makes some key changes, but opponents say under the state constitution, the lease still needs to be approved by a two-thirds majority of the Legislature.

"Say NO to 145-mile CMP transmission line through Maine" via Facebook

A Cumberland County Superior Court judge ruled on Monday that a citizens initiative aimed at killing Central Maine Power’s power line project can stay on the November ballot.

Robert F. Bukaty / AP Images

There was more legal action Tuesday in the fight over Central Maine Power’s (CMP) proposed powerline through the state's western woods. One well-financed opposition group called Stop the Corridor filed suit Tuesday in an ongoing dispute over whether it can keep its funding sources secret.

Fred Bever / Maine Public

Secretary of State Matthew Dunlap says a ballot measure that backers hope would kill Central Maine Power’s proposed power line through the state’s western woods may well be unconstitutional. But he also says it should stay on the ballot.

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