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Fish Passage: Populations of Sea-Run Fish Gain Access to Maine Waters Through Conservation Work

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https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/infographic/ripple-effects-atlantic-salmon-conservation
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The removal of the Edwards Dam from the Kennebec River — and the Great Works and Veazie Dams from the Penobscot — made national news and ushered in a new era for Maine's sea run fish. But the work is far from over. We'll discuss projects to remove dams, create fish passages and reconstruct culverts all over the state, and what these projects mean for the health of our rivers and streams. This program ties in with the publication of a new book this month about the Penobscot River restoration project.

Guests

Molly Payne Wynne, freshwater program director, The Nature Conservancy

Pete Didisheim, advocacy director, Natural Resources Council of Maine

John Banks, director, Department of Natural Resources, Penobscot Nation

Eileen Bader Hall, watershed restoration specialist, The Nature Conservancy

Landis Hudson, executive director, Maine Rivers

Resources

Cindy’s first foray into journalism after graduating from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism was to intern with CNN in China in the wake of the Tiananmen Square massacre. She then worked in print journalism over the decades, as a factchecker, writer and editor, with publications ranging from the Los Angeles Times Magazine to the magazine of the National Zoo—where she walked past the cheetahs on the way to work each morning—to a food trends magazine.