healthcare

Health care workers are expected to be first in line to be offered a COVID-19 vaccine when one is available.

It makes sense: Getting a safe, effective vaccine would help keep them and their patients healthy. Seeing doctors, nurses and medical aides getting COVID-19 vaccines would also set an example for the community.

When then-presidential candidate Donald Trump spoke in Manchester, N.H., a week before the 2016 election, he said the opioid crisis was destroying lives and shattering families.

"We are going to stop the inflow of drugs into New Hampshire and into our country 100%," Trump promised.

It was a major campaign issue. Overdoses were surging in battleground states key to the election, like New Hampshire, Ohio and Pennsylvania.

Eli Lilly & Co. is ending a clinical trial of its antibody drug bamlanivimab in hospitalized COVID-19 patients after federal researchers concluded the therapy produced no marked improvement.

Judge Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court confirmation could open the door to a world that many anti-abortion-rights activists have been envisioning for decades.

"I hope and pray that we will be in a world post-Roe v. Wade," said Carrie Murray Nellis, 41, an adoption attorney based in Georgia.

President Trump has tried to get rid of the Affordable Care Act since the first day of his presidency, but there's one part of Obamacare that he wants to preserve.

"We will always protect patients with preexisting conditions — always," Trump told a campaign crowd on Sunday in Londonderry, N.H. It's a message he has shared repeatedly in the final days and weeks before the presidential election.

seksan Mongkhonkhamsao / Getty Images via NPR

The Legislature is considering the creation of a new state commission charged with finding ways to reduce the cost of healthcare in Maine.

In an effort to reduce unnecessary hospital readmission rates, the Eastern Maine Medical Center Emergency Department is partnering with primary care providers in a research study aimed at ensuring timely follow-up care.

FILE - Republican Sen. Susan Collins and  independent Sen. Angus King speak to reporters after King announced his endorsement in her bid for a fourth term, Friday, May 16, 2014, at the Margaret Chase Smith Library in Skowhegan, Maine.
AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File

The latest attempt by the U.S. Senate to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act has failed to garner support from Maine’s senators.

FILE: Sen. Angus King I-Maine, attends the christening ceremony for the USS Raphael Peralta, the 35th Arleigh Burke Class Missile Destroyer to be built by Bath Iron Works, Saturday, Oct. 31, 2015, in Bath, Maine.
AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File

Bangor-area residents took their concerns over the impact of the Republican-led American Health Care Act directly to Independent Maine Sen. Angus King today during a listening session at the Bangor Public Library. The event was organized by the AARP, an advocacy group for 50-plus Americans, and King said that while the measure cleared the U.S. House earlier this month, how the bill will fare in the GOP-controlled Senate remains to be seen.

http://engageduniversity.blogs.wesleyan.edu/files/2013/11/understandingtheaca.jpg

There's been a lot of attention paid to the consumer side of the Affordable Care Act. But the ACA is a sweeping piece of legislation, and it does a lot more than provide coverage for the uninsured. In short, the ACA seeks to reform the way health care is delivered in America. The goal is healthier patients AND lower costs, a tall order. How is Maine's health care system changing under the ACA?

Guests:

  The Maine Health Access Foundation recently held annual meeting with keynote speaker Alan Weil, Executive Director of the National Academy for State Health Policy. Weil is a non-partisan health policy expert and advises states on health policy issues, now focused on reform implementation.

[Audio of this program is no longer available]