Deep Dive: Child Care

Mark Vogelzang / Maine Public

Prospective Maine child care providers are unclear about the process of opening up shop — and the state is taking steps to bring some clarity. That’s among the findings of a public forum hosted by Maine Public’s news team at the Portland Public Library on Monday night.

childcarechoices.me screenshot

The Maine Department of Health and Human Services is launching a statewide marketing campaign to promote a website designed to connect parents and child care providers.

Courtesy University of Quebec at Montreal.

Just over the border of western Maine, the province of Quebec created a government-subsidized universal child care system for preschool-age children 20 years ago. Advocates of the system say it has provided parents with affordable child care, but acknowledge that the quality has been inconsistent among nonprofit and for-profit providers.

Kevin Bennett for Maine Public

This show is part of Maine Public's Deep Dive Special Series on child care in Maine.

We wrap up Maine Public's special child care series with a conversation about challenges and priorities for child care in Maine. What are some potential solutions or paths forward? What is being done elsewhere that is a model for our state? And are there policies or programs that show promise for alleviating the child care crisis?

Mark your calendar! Join the Maine Public news department for a community discussion around Maine Public's Deep Dive on child care in Maine on 5:30-7 p.m. Monday, July 8, at the Portland Public Library Rines Auditorium at 5 Monument Square. Hosted by Patty Wight, Maine Public's reporters will meet to discuss what was learned and next steps surrounding the issues that were touched on in the series. They will also be there to hear from you and listen to your comments and field your questions.


This story is part of Maine Public’s Deep Dive on child care. To see the rest of the series, visit mainepublic.org/childcare.

Maine Public’s Deep Dive: Childcare in Maine is made possible, in part, by the John T. Gorman Foundation and United Way's Women United.

This story is part of Maine Public’s Deep Dive on child care. To see the rest of the series, visit mainepublic.org/childcare.

Maine Public’s Deep Dive: Childcare in Maine is made possible, in part, by the John T. Gorman Foundation and United Way's Women United.

Northwestern University Library

On Monday, Oct. 20, 1943, a two-room nursery school opened in Brunswick. Though nursery schools were not particularly common at the time, this would not have been notable, except for one thing: the new nursery school was part of a program which, for the first and only time in U.S. history, provided cheap, universally available, federally subsidized child care.

Andrew Catalina / Maine Public

The Maine Department of Health and Human Services is trying to improve transparency about enforcement actions it takes to ensure the safety and welfare of children attending licensed child care facilities in Maine, but reporting by Maine Public shows that it has fallen short of its own goals in at least one case, while advocates say it is still too difficult for parents to research a facility’s quality and history.

This story is part of Maine Public’s Deep Dive on child care. To see the rest of the series, visit mainepublic.org/childcare.

Maine Public’s Deep Dive: Childcare in Maine is made possible, in part, by the John T. Gorman Foundation and United Way's Women United.

This story is part of Maine Public’s Deep Dive on child care. To see the rest of the series, visit mainepublic.org/childcare.

Maine Public’s Deep Dive: Childcare in Maine is made possible, in part, by the John T. Gorman Foundation and United Way's Women United.

This story is part of Maine Public’s Deep Dive on child care. To see the rest of the series, visit mainepublic.org/childcare.

Maine Public’s Deep Dive: Childcare in Maine is made possible, in part, by the John T. Gorman Foundation and United Way's Women United.

This story is part of Maine Public’s Deep Dive on child care. To see the rest of the series, visit mainepublic.org/childcare.

Maine Public’s Deep Dive: Childcare in Maine is made possible, in part, by the John T. Gorman Foundation and United Way's Women United.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/ratterrell/

We hear from Maine Public News team editors and reporters, as well as from Tara Williams, executive director of the Maine Association for the Education of Young Children, about the issues we’ll be covering during this week’s special deep dive series on child care in Maine.

This story is part of Maine Public’s Deep Dive on child care. To see the rest of the series, visit mainepublic.org/childcare.

Maine Public’s Deep Dive: Childcare in Maine is made possible, in part, by the John T. Gorman Foundation and United Way's Women United.

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