coronavirus

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. - The U.S. Treasury Department has yet to send payments to tribal governments from a coronavirus relief package approved in late March.

Justin Kase Conder / AP Images for Aspen Dental

Dentists in Maine say they still don’t know when they can reopen under Gov. Janet Mills’ plan announced last week.

Organizers of 10 of the state’s annual summer agricultural fairs have decided to cancel their 2020 season.

The University of New England has announced that it’s bringing students back to its Biddeford and Portland campuses for the fall semester and, in some cases, even earlier.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/149561324@N03/

As much of the non-coronavirus health care in Maine shifts to telemedicine, we discuss how that is working for doctors and patients. For years, telehealth has been touted as a helpful tool for both health care providers and patients who face challenges meeting in person. Now that it's being implemented widely due to the pandemic, what are the pros and cons of virtual doctor's visits? And will this change the delivery of health care in the future?

David J. Phillip / AP

The Maine Center for Disease Control Sunday is reporting another 33 cases of COVID-19 in the state, for a total of 1,185. Another person has died, bringing the total number of COVID-related deaths to 57. The CDC is cautioning Mainers not to assume that COVID-19 is the primary cause of death in each of these cases. 

Seven-hundred-six people have recovered from the disease in Maine.

Wild Oats Bakery and Cafe

Restaurants were some of the first businesses closed due to COVID-19, and the timing couldn't have been worse for Wild Oats Bakery & Cafe in Brunswick. The cafe was in the middle of a building project and trying to move to a new location when the town issued its stay-at-home order.

Maine Public File

The Maine Voting and Elections Coalition is submitting a petition to Gov. Janet Mills this week asking her to assure that the July primary is as accessible as possible.

The Senate returns to Washington this week, but one of Maine’s two Senators believes the coronavirus pandemic is not getting the level of attention it deserves.

Mal Leary / Maine Public

For the second time in as many weeks, protesters gathered on the streets and sidewalks around the governor’s mansion, the Blaine House, to urge further relaxation of restrictions designed to curb the spread of COVID-19.

Willis Ryder Arnold / Maine Public

The Maine Center for Disease Control Saturday is reporting 1,152 confirmed cases of COVID-19 and an additional death in the state, making 56 total deaths.

In an emailed statement, Robert Long of the Maine CDC said Saturday's death was a Waldo County woman who was older than 80. Also in the email, Long said to "note that COVID-related deaths reflect the number of Maine residents who’ve tested positive for COVID-19 who have died. Please do not assume that COVID-19 is the primary cause of death in each of these cases."

David J. Phillip / AP Photo

As the number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Maine and other states appears to plateau, scientists and public health experts are looking for ways to track people who may have had it and recovered. One way is with antibody tests, which are used to determine infections and, potentially, who may have immunity to the disease. But the antibody tests now being offered in Maine and elsewhere are far from conclusive.

Jennifer Mitchell / Maine Public File

It was supposed to be a great year for Maine potatoes. Last year's harvest was strong, and this year should have seen about 3,000 new acres brought into production, but the sudden arrival of COVID-19 has changed all that.

Maine Public File

Municipal election officials across the state are exploring options for conducting the July primary elections without many of the poll workers that they have come to depend on. Some workers say they won’t be showing up because of concerns about the coronavirus.

Theater at Monmouth

When problems arise in the world of theater, the rallying cry has long been "the show must go on," but that's just not the case for many theater companies in Maine that have cancelled their spring and summer seasons because of the spread of COVID-19. And now, sights are now set on future seasons.

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